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  Topic Review (Newest First)
03-29-2013 05:20 AM
Hoppy
Quote:
Originally Posted by KingOfTheFeeshes View Post
That's just not true... If you have much higher CO2 levels, your oxygen level may stay the same - but is lower in relation to the oxygen. As air is a solution, this is all distributed evenly. CO2 might not get rid of the oxygen, but it most definitely displaces it.
If you're correctly dosing your CO2 for your tank, you're also effectively asphyxiating your beneficial bacteria via this method of diffusion.
If CO2 displaces O2, where does the O2 that is displaced go? I don't believe this is true. Unless you are adding a lot more than 1% of anything to the air It shouldn't have any effect on the O2 percentage in the air - about 20%. And, we only add perhaps .3-.4% CO2 at the most. Furthermore, lots of people run their CO2 through the filter, without adverse effects, except it is possible to run into cavitation in the pump if you get too big a bubble of gas at one time.
03-29-2013 05:03 AM
KingOfTheFeeshes
Quote:
Originally Posted by gSTiTcH View Post
CO2 in the water column does not displace oxygen, and will not have any effect on the BB in the filter.
That's just not true... If you have much higher CO2 levels, your oxygen level may stay the same - but is lower in relation to the oxygen. As air is a solution, this is all distributed evenly. CO2 might not get rid of the oxygen, but it most definitely displaces it.
If you're correctly dosing your CO2 for your tank, you're also effectively asphyxiating your beneficial bacteria via this method of diffusion.

--edit--
I just ran into a post about this somewhere on the forum, and realized that I was being presumptuous when i made this comment... Hoppy is right (as usual).
Generally one does not displace the other in any extreme way, although I've heard of people causing their fish to gasp with unreasonably high CO2 levels. It would take a heck of a lot of CO2 to do significant harm to the aquarium. You should be fine with the CO2 in the intake for a few weeks, although I still wouldn't leave it there permanently. I've heard too many stories of people having problems with this to truly ever feel *safe* about it.
03-22-2013 09:36 PM
Imi Statue
Quote:
Originally Posted by gSTiTcH View Post
CO2 in the water column does not displace oxygen, and will not have any effect on the BB in the filter.
That's interesting... I have had perfectly normal filters die-off because of c02 being injected through the intakes(nothing else changed). So until someone can prove to me that this is different I think I would not use this method.
03-22-2013 09:00 PM
gSTiTcH
Quote:
Originally Posted by Imi Statue View Post
Not sure about your filter type and such but it should be receiving oxygen instead of c02 for the bacteria to live, therefore hooking the c02 up to the intake of the filter is not the best choice
CO2 in the water column does not displace oxygen, and will not have any effect on the BB in the filter.
03-22-2013 04:03 AM
Imi Statue Not sure about your filter type and such but it should be receiving oxygen instead of c02 for the bacteria to live, therefore hooking the c02 up to the intake of the filter is not the best choice, in fact I would hook it up to the output returning the water flow down into the tank directionally so that the c02 will be in contact with the water column longer.

As for how long it will last there are variables like water chemistry (mainly Ph from tap) how many bubbles per second are the main ones. You'll know how long after the first bottle is used up and you create your second bottle the same way you can expect the same amount of time then. Here's a link for complete info on the subject especially about the amounts of each ingredient used in the bottle, and there effects if reduced/increased. http://www.qsl.net/w2wdx/aquaria/diyco2.html#6
03-22-2013 04:00 AM
Mahawka With the 2 cups of sugar and a half-teaspoon of yeast in a 2-litre bottle set up I get about 3 weeks of Co2 before I have to change it up. I found that after week 2 the co2 powe drops by 1/2

I am not sure about your filter situation.
03-22-2013 03:53 AM
Mahawka Congratulation !!!
03-22-2013 02:45 AM
Smeagol
It's working! It's wooorrrkiiing!!!



Please forgive my excitement.... I just set up my first DIY CO2 rig... didn't think anything was gonna happen.... it just looked like a jug of cloudy water.... so I sat down on the sofa with book.... an hour later.... BUBBLES! I couldn't believe it!



Questions:

I used a standard mix of 2 cups of sugar and a half-teaspoon of yeast in a 2-litre bottle. How long can I expect this mixture to "burn"?

I'm temporarily feeding the CO2 into the filter intake while I wait for my diffuser to arrive from Hong Kong. Is it safe to run it this way for a couple weeks, or am I risking serious damage to my filter?

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