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Topic Review (Newest First)
03-30-2014 10:39 PM
Dzrtman
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dalban View Post
Actually, all of the test described in the first post of this thread applies equally to single-stage regulators -- except for the note at step 2 F. Contrary to the implication in the original post, these tests aren't really designed to test each stage so much as it is to determine whether there's a leak before air regulation or after. You want the same assurances for your single-stage regulator.

Anyway, the advice you received from your vendor is not entirely bad... except it's missing a vital step. After you close the co2 tank valve, you'll want to partially close your regulator (one or two turns counter-clockwise). If you leave it for 10-15 minutes and the LP gauge reads lower (by more than 2-3 psi), then you have a leak on the LP side.
Thank you for the clarification. It's been a couple of days since I closed the valve on the CO2 tank. I left the regulator connected to the tank with the approx 800 psi reading on the HP gauge. I will repeat step 2E...

So before performing step 2E, I partially closed the regulator as you suggested. After performing step 2E I noticed the LP gauge went PAST it's maximum reading, almost to the zero position but on the right-hand side. I turned the regulator valve anticlockwise until the LP gauge registered 14.5 lbs psi. After 20 minutes the LP gauge is still reading 14.5 lbs.

So, a BIG THANK YOU, for explained the test was still valid for a single-stage regulator. And, I think your recommendation to turn the regulator anticlockwise several turns before performing step 2E is good advice. Versus step 2D which says to turn the regulator anticlockwise until there is no resistance; it was this step that set the LP gauge to zero, so when I performed step 2E there was no pressure left for the LP to "save".
03-29-2014 03:15 PM
Dalban
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dzrtman View Post
Now I see how naive I am, thinking that 2 gauges indicated a 2-stage regulator. Thank you for pointing this out. So if there is only 1 stage, a 2nd stage/low-pressure test is not possible...

I never thought to ask Aquariumplants if this was a two-stage regulator
Actually, all of the test described in the first post of this thread applies equally to single-stage regulators -- except for the note at step 2 F. Contrary to the implication in the original post, these tests aren't really designed to test each stage so much as it is to determine whether there's a leak before air regulation or after. You want the same assurances for your single-stage regulator.

Anyway, the advice you received from your vendor is not entirely bad... except it's missing a vital step. After you close the co2 tank valve, you'll want to partially close your regulator (one or two turns counter-clockwise). If you leave it for 10-15 minutes and the LP gauge reads lower (by more than 2-3 psi), then you have a leak on the LP side.
03-28-2014 10:18 PM
Dzrtman
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldpunk78 View Post
Also note that you have a single stage unit there. Not 2-stage.
Now I see how naive I am, thinking that 2 gauges indicated a 2-stage regulator. Thank you for pointing this out. So if there is only 1 stage, a 2nd stage/low-pressure test is not possible...

I never thought to ask Aquariumplants if this was a two-stage regulator
03-28-2014 10:08 PM
Dzrtman Thank you for responding AlanLe. The solenoid was not connected to power when I performed the test.
03-28-2014 10:08 PM
oldpunk78 Also note that you have a single stage unit there. Not 2-stage.
03-28-2014 08:34 PM
AlanLe
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dzrtman View Post
I just purchased from Aquariumplants.com the 2-stage regulator, with a mouse solenoid and Ideal needle valve, shown in the two attached photos. The high-pressure test conducted over 16 hours performed as described in the original post of this thread; in other words after closing the CO2 bottle valve, the HP gauge continued to show the starting pressure over a period of 16 hours.

However, the low-pressure test does NOT result in the pressure remaining in the LP gauge. Instead, when I turn the regulator control anticlockwise the LP pressure gauge returns to zero. Soap water on the various connections showed no visible leaks, so I concluded either the LP side of the regulator has an internal leak, or the solenoid...

Since this is a new unit I called Aquariumplants.com rather than attempting to removing the solenoid as suggested in the guide. The person I spoke to said the unit in the shop behaved in the same way. He said the way to perform the "bleed" test on this regulator, with the CO2 bottle valve closed, was to leave pressure in the HP regulator and leave the regulator valve open to maintain pressure in the LP regulator. In other words, it is not possible to isolate CO2 in the LP regulator.

I'm NEW to CO2, so I would appreciate an experienced member's thoughts on whether the information being provided by the person I spoke to at Aquarium plants could be correct for THIS regulator? Or could this be a misunderstanding on the part of the Aquariumplants employee and I need to ask to talk to someone more experienced?

Thank you,

Robin
Did you unplug the solenoid when testing the lp pressure gauge?

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03-28-2014 08:05 PM
Dzrtman
Low pressure test question

I just purchased from Aquariumplants.com the 2-stage regulator, with a mouse solenoid and Ideal needle valve, shown in the two attached photos. The high-pressure test conducted over 16 hours performed as described in the original post of this thread; in other words after closing the CO2 bottle valve, the HP gauge continued to show the starting pressure over a period of 16 hours.

However, the low-pressure test does NOT result in the pressure remaining in the LP gauge. Instead, when I turn the regulator control anticlockwise the LP pressure gauge returns to zero. Soap water on the various connections showed no visible leaks, so I concluded either the LP side of the regulator has an internal leak, or the solenoid...

Since this is a new unit I called Aquariumplants.com rather than attempting to removing the solenoid as suggested in the guide. The person I spoke to said the unit in the shop behaved in the same way. He said the way to perform the "bleed" test on this regulator, with the CO2 bottle valve closed, was to leave pressure in the HP regulator and leave the regulator valve open to maintain pressure in the LP regulator. In other words, it is not possible to isolate CO2 in the LP regulator.

I'm NEW to CO2, so I would appreciate an experienced member's thoughts on whether the information being provided by the person I spoke to at Aquarium plants could be correct for THIS regulator? Or could this be a misunderstanding on the part of the Aquariumplants employee and I need to ask to talk to someone more experienced?

Thank you,

Robin
03-15-2014 06:10 PM
Bettatail
Quote:
Originally Posted by flowerfishs View Post
step 1. I only have around 680 psi to test. not sure that will be enough
after 6 hours. No psi drop at all




step 2. set the psi at 70
then screw off the CGA 320 off the tank. wait for 30 minutes before I record the psi. PSI still the same at 70. leave it on my desk over night for 8 hours. psi still at 70 psi.




Just the test of the regulator. no post body.
carry on.
03-15-2014 05:19 PM
flowerfishs step 1. I only have around 680 psi to test. not sure that will be enough
after 6 hours. No psi drop at all




step 2. set the psi at 70
then screw off the CGA 320 off the tank. wait for 30 minutes before I record the psi. PSI still the same at 70. leave it on my desk over night for 8 hours. psi still at 70 psi.




Just the test of the regulator. no post body.
03-04-2014 03:52 AM
Kensho Hit 750 at 75


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03-03-2014 05:08 AM
Bettatail
Quote:
Originally Posted by RLee View Post

Please listen Betta tells it like it is no matter what. No bull pucky. I would of used another adjective but this forum does not allow it.
,
03-03-2014 04:35 AM
RLee
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bettatail View Post
more than likely the problem is the gauge, hopefully it is calibrate issue.

and what is the temperature of the co2 tank?
if the temperature is low(not the frosted freshly filled), the pressure is low too.

I remember last winter there was a member his room temp is about 60, the pressure is around 600 psi, but back up to 800 psi when the room temp rised to 75 for a couple days.
Please listen Betta tells it like it is no matter what. No bull pucky. I would of used another adjective but this forum does not allow it.
03-03-2014 03:44 AM
Kensho Never got above 600psi.the room temp got to 69.


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02-27-2014 04:26 AM
FlyingHellFish ^ We have very similar regulator, I wouldn't worry too much about that. The test leak is the most important. Remember, the gauge goes to 4000 psi, it's not meant to be super precise.

The tube inside the gauge might be a bit bent, which is fine if it's an old gauge. And 61F is pretty cool, I get 800 around 71.
02-27-2014 03:29 AM
Kensho It's about 61 degrees in the room I have it in, and holding steady at 600 psi.


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