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Topic Review (Newest First)
01-22-2014 02:50 AM
Tom in Cincy Hi. New here but love Arduino projects. Looking to buy a scrap of 2447 and a sensor if anyone has any extra.
01-04-2014 12:18 AM
mistergreen something weird. Check for shorts.
try this simplified code. It simply reads analog 0.

Code:
void setup() {
Serial.begin(115200); // Max for Arduino Uno
}

void loop() {
  int sensorValue = analogRead(0);
  Serial.println(sensorValue);
}
The values are not par but should change in different lighting situations. If it doesn't, something is wrong with the hardware.
01-03-2014 11:44 PM
seran
Quote:
Originally Posted by mistergreen View Post
What's your code? It might be the software.
This code is what I used. Is there any something wrong?

Quote:
<CODE>

// CLOSE ENOUGH PAR Written in Arduino 23 By MISTERGREEN
// for sunlight and indoor light
#include <math.h>
float average = 0;
float output_indoor = 0;
float output_outdoor = 0;
float factor = 0;
unsigned long time;
int counter = 0;

void setup() {
time = millis();
// set up the LCD's number of rows and columns:
Serial.begin(115200); // Max for Arduino Uno
}

void loop() {

int sensorValue = analogRead(0);
average += sensorValue;
counter++;

//every second or 1000 millis
if(millis() > time+1000) {
//corrections to fit par
average = average/counter;

if(average <= 560) {
factor = 2.077;
}
else {
factor = 1.934;
}
float tempout = average * factor;
//indoor fluorensence
output_indoor = tempout;

//add 10% to output for sunlight
output_outdoor = tempout + (tempout * .10);

Serial.print(output_indoor);
Serial.print(",");
Serial.println(output_outdoor);

//reset timer & counter to get ready for the next second.
time = millis();
counter = 0;
average = 0;

}

delay(5);

}
01-02-2014 02:57 PM
mistergreen What's your code? It might be the software.
01-02-2014 02:46 PM
seran
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeff52478 View Post
Check the polarity on the photo diode, if it is in backwards you will read max par on the display ( uasually around 1300-1400)
I checked the polarity on the photo diode and still get the value like 1300 ~ 1400.

I connected the photo diode to Arduino mega like this picture.



yellow jumper wire --> analog pin a0
red jumper wire --> VCC(5V)
green jumper wire --> GND

Could you look at this picture?
How should I connect the jumper wire correctly?
01-02-2014 01:06 PM
mistergreen +1


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk HD
01-02-2014 10:32 AM
Jeff52478
Quote:
Originally Posted by seran View Post
Hi Mistergreen,

I want to build myself one of these 'good enough par' meters.

But I am having a bit of trouble getting the PAR value. I used main resistance 15.9K(one 15k ohm and three 300 ohm resistance)and connected the VTB8441BH to arduino like your diagram on the breadboard. but the PAR value is like 1357.00 ~ 1400.00 (using serial monitor) and it didn't change when the brightness was changed.
I think that something is wrong.

Do you know what is the problem? and Would you show me the lastest diagram?
Check the polarity on the photo diode, if it is in backwards you will read max par on the display ( uasually around 1300-1400)
01-01-2014 07:55 AM
seran Hi Mistergreen,

I want to build myself one of these 'good enough par' meters.

But I am having a bit of trouble getting the PAR value. I used main resistance 15.9K(one 15k ohm and three 300 ohm resistance)and connected the VTB8441BH to arduino like your diagram on the breadboard. but the PAR value is like 1357.00 ~ 1400.00 (using serial monitor) and it didn't change when the brightness was changed.
I think that something is wrong.

Do you know what is the problem? and Would you show me the lastest diagram?
08-10-2013 12:16 AM
mistergreen
Quote:
Originally Posted by mr.bigglesworth View Post
So Confused........



ENGLISH PLEASE!
(Kidding. No but seriously, I lost you after firmware..... :| )
Heh, firmware is software that runs the hardware.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk HD
08-10-2013 12:07 AM
mr.bigglesworth So Confused........



ENGLISH PLEASE!
(Kidding. No but seriously, I lost you after firmware..... :| )
08-05-2013 09:36 PM
jeffkrol Guess I may have to stop my green bashing.. based on this.. go figure..
http://pcp.oxfordjournals.org/content/50/4/684.full

Quote:
Absorbance spectra of chlorophylls or pigments extracted from green leaves show that green light is absorbed only weakly. Action spectra of photosynthesis for thin algal solutions, transparent thalli of ordinary green algae, and leaves of aquatic angiosperms also show that green light is less effective than red light. As has been pointed out by Nishio (2000), these facts are often confused, and it is frequently argued that green light is inefficient for photosynthesis in green leaves. However, many spectra of absorptance (the absolute value of light absorption) measured with integrating spheres have shown clearly that ordinary, green leaves of land plants absorb a substantial fraction of green light
well sort of...........
Quote:
However, light sources with a higher fraction of green photons (> 50 % of total PPF) resulted in the reduced plant growth. Among the levels of green photons tested, the addition of 24 % green light (500 – 600) to red and blue LEDs enhanced plant growth..NASA
.


and actually fits w/ the first link because they were referring to green in the presence of high white light..
Blink and the world changes..............
Anyways in re: to PAR meters.. so much for filtering out the "green"....
08-05-2013 06:56 PM
mistergreen
Quote:
Originally Posted by opcode1300 View Post
Anyway to get just a sensor? I have the rest of the parts.
Thanks!
Oh, I missed this, yeah, just Pm me.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk HD
08-05-2013 06:32 PM
jeffkrol
Quote:
Originally Posted by mistergreen View Post
Yes, I have the apogee PAR sensor calibrated for indoor light. It's the only way I can see what I'm building is close enough.

Check out Hoppy's thread on his PAR sensor. He uses the same photodiode as me but also use a violet filter. It isn't expensive. I proposed the filter use at first but not sure how big a difference it'll make.
That sensor is, itself $140... My point was, knowing some of the specifics, it puts it into the "cheap stuff" sensor range..

The filter will make a difference but not as much as having a cutoff @ 600nm-ish will to real "par"..

more info:
http://www.advancedaquarist.com/2013/2/equipment
08-05-2013 04:08 PM
mistergreen Yes, I have the apogee PAR sensor calibrated for indoor light. It's the only way I can see what I'm building is close enough.

Check out Hoppy's thread on his PAR sensor. He uses the same photodiode as me but also use a violet filter. It isn't expensive. I proposed the filter use at first but not sure how big a difference it'll make.
08-05-2013 03:56 PM
jeffkrol Then again there is this..
http://www.apogeeinstruments.com/con...essMay1997.pdf
W/ a completely different chart...

On a more personal (and nit picky) point I am more worried about the poor response in the really important red area than the green vs blue areas..

Fun FYI:
$10 light meter...
http://bigbro.biophys.cornell.edu/~t...ight_Meter.pdf

And an interesting photodiode.. w no idea of the cost..
http://www.ophiropt.com/laser/pdf/PD...W_PD300-TP.pdf

And a really fun toy:
http://www.vetco.net/catalog/product...FYWe4AodDSoAFQ

Quote:
In the TCS3200, the light-to-frequency converter reads an 8 x 8 array of photodiodes. Sixteen photodiodes have
blue filters, 16 photodiodes have green filters, 16 photodiodes have red filters, and 16 photodiodes are clear
with no filters.


Please forgive the diversion.............
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