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Topic Review (Newest First)
07-30-2013 05:13 PM
Dannyul Your tank looks well - keep it up!

Best of luck,
Dan
07-30-2013 04:40 PM
Flear i tend to look for more natural methods, ... while this is just theory, ... i get to test to see if clams will clear up greenwater, ... or keep it in check, first is to see if assassin snails will eat clams
07-30-2013 01:44 AM
Digital1 Updated OP, see video!
03-03-2013 09:13 PM
VAtanks depends on your polishing pad some are chemically treated i.e carbon/zeo-carb/nitrate removed/phosphate remover, how ever I'm assuming Seuadr is just talking about polishing pad in the terms of fine filtering material meaning it has the ability to collect smaller particles in the water passing through it, I use quilt batting from (enter craft store name) 8 dollars for 25 yards.
03-03-2013 06:36 PM
Digital1
Re: What is going wrong here?

Thanks again to all who have stopped by..
Would a polishing pad affect the ferts I put in? I read that it would remove nitrogen and what not.. But at this point i have kept up my dosing and regiment, minus water changes as recommended and things are starting to look better..

Sent from my SCH-I535 using Tapatalk 2
03-01-2013 11:43 PM
seuadr just a heads up, your fluval 305 will accept a "polishing pad" which will help. i also wouldn't worry about additional filtering or flow, the 305 is good for up to 70 gallons and pumps 260 gph. unless your tank is a lot larger than it looks, you should have plenty of filtering, unless all of your sponges are plugged (which doesn't seem likely with the tank being 3 months old)

a purigen pad might be helpful for future water clarity as well.
03-01-2013 10:22 PM
OVT You have Algae Bloom aka Green Water. It's relatively common in newer tanks and it does not harm fish. The amount of dis-information on this condition is abundant on the web...

Stop doing water changes - it will only prolong the bloom.
Adding an UV sterilizer will clear up the water in 2 - 3 days.
Leave everything as is sans water changes and it will go away by itself in about a week.

Once it's gone, the plants will bounce back.

I blame the cats
03-01-2013 04:23 PM
Digital1
Re: What is going wrong here?

Thanks all for replying to my issues.. For now I just did a pwc and shorten the photo period. I'm going see what happens over the next few days and make adjustments if needed. The thing is my tank was doing great while fish less cycling and after I added the fish is when everything changed.. The only thing I changed was ferts, which I started half dosing because I did not want to over do it with new fish.. Maybe by half dosing I caused my plant growth to stall? Because they don't look thriving as before.. In fact they look dormant....

Sent from my SCH-I535 using Tapatalk 2
02-28-2013 02:52 PM
Ed's Fish Tank Hi DarkCobra, Thanks for the feedback info. Much appreciated. I think the lighting in my tank is on the low side so have added a small "bar" of LED's. The diatoms are no problem thou. From years past, have had all kinds of algae, now I know it's a "given" to have at least some sort of algae.

Thing is, I still don't have a phosphate test kit, so added the Phos-Zorb and Ammo-Chips on a hunch that my organics were building up too high. My 3 tanks have been going now for 3 months and water is crystal clear in all of them, plants are fine too and growing. The tap water I use does come from the St. John's River and there has been a lot of hub-bub about lawn fertilizer "run-off" and high phosphate levels in lots of streams, etc. So, I am experimenting some here, against the idea that the water company has left the phosphates in the water.

Thank You Very Much for taking the time to explain things in more depth than I could ever figure out on my own!
02-28-2013 07:18 AM
chew Looks kinda like a bacterial bloom to me. Happened to me when my biowheel stopped spinning and all the bacteria died in there. I ran a couple air stones in my tank and lowered photoperiod and stopped co2 and it ran its course after about a week
02-28-2013 05:13 AM
DarkCobra Ed, regrouping these according to category:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ed's Fish Tank View Post
1. STOP all ferts.
5. Do water changes of 10gal every 4 days or so as to not shock the fish.
10. After you do all the above, you might want to get an API Phosphate PO4 test kit. If you have high phosphates, which I suspect, then you can CUT them down easily by adding a second HOB fliter, like a Fluval 30 or 50 and pack it with API Ammo-Chips AND API Phos-Zorb.
12. You should also check the substrate for iron content. This will help the plants grow, so when things settle down and you have clear water, then you might not have to use so much ferts or CO2. Your plants are small and don't "really" need much now except the nitrates from the good bacteria.
13. When you do see plant growth, go easy on the ferts! (err on the side of less is more)
I've noticed you recommending severe nutrient limitation in several of your recent posts, despite having been told by multiple folks that excess ferts don't cause algae. Let me see if I can explain this better.

I run a tank with 30ppm phosphate and I don't have green water, or other algae.

Yes, limiting phosphates to near zero will in fact reduce green water, by starving it out. It does need nutrients to grow, but nutrients are not what causes it to grow. If anything is responsible for that, it's an excess of organic wastes, rather than chemical ferts.

Reducing fertilization is therefore not addressing the cause. In fact, it's often counterproductive, because the plants may starve too. Limit any one of their nutrients and it limits their uptake of them all - including their ability to remove organic wastes, and prevent algae. Starve them enough and they start to decompose, actually becoming organic waste and actually encouraging algae growth.

It's absolutely no surprise you have a persistent diatom bloom in your tank, with your water nitrates levels at zero, your phosphate adsorbing resins, and nearly inert substrate.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ed's Fish Tank View Post
6. Use only a pinch of fish food, like Omega One Flakes. Only feed once a day. Some flake foods contain phosphates as preservatives. Check the Tetra label for phosphates!
All fish food contains phosphates. It's a natural and necessary component of food, without which fish would die. Some are higher than others, though that's really only an issue in non-planted and saltwater tanks.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ed's Fish Tank View Post
7. Your pH is LOW, check your tap water for pH and if low or if you are using a water softener, then you might consider bypassing it somehow.
8. Setup and run an airstone ALL the time. Algae die off robs O2 from the water.
14. And whatever you do DON'T try to raise the pH with liquid chemicals! Shoot for a pH that's around 7.5. Then, the fish waste will naturally lower it. Then, you raise it back up again with WC's! Simple! The WC's alone should be enough to gradually raise the pH.
Digital1's tank has CO2 injection, which is lowering the pH, and is normal.
02-28-2013 04:37 AM
DarkCobra +1 to Karce87. The light doesn't seem excessive, but temporarily reducing it may help this pass quicker, as will a sponge prefilter for the Fluval.

If it doesn't pass in a few weeks, or you're impatient, and you decide to use Tetra Algae Control (or AlgaeFix), use only 1/4 recommended dose. Turn off CO2, and aerate HEAVILY until the water significantly clears. Ed is right that a fast algae die-off depletes O2. If that doesn't knock it out, wait a few days and try again with 1/2 dose. A full dose isn't necessary for green water, and there's a possibility it may harm fish.
02-28-2013 04:33 AM
UDGags I would reduce the lights to 8hrs and possibly reduce the intensity (not sure what PAR you have at substrate).

If possible I would get more plants as well.
02-28-2013 03:09 AM
karce87 You have green water so reducing or stopping dosing would not do anything. Neither do water changes. Green water will last for a while and just go away on its own at some point if you have the patience. Or else, you can resort to these options: blackout, diatom filter, UV light, and Tetra algae control. I tried UV and Tetra for two of my tanks and they both worked. Good luck with it!

Did you move your tank around before?
02-28-2013 12:35 AM
Ed's Fish Tank Hi, OK, I'm just a noob at this, but know I could fix the problem if it was my tank.

Here's what I would do:

1. STOP all ferts.
2. Use LESS light! Remove the dimmer one. Looks like you have two there. As for light, the watts per gallon rule doesn't usually work so well any more. Base your lighting on PAR, PUR and LUMENS.
3. The filter should pump at least 200 gph min, like a Fluval 50. Clean it but first scrape the algae off the sides of the tank, etc. and let the filter take up all the green stuff.
4. Lower the light to say 8-9hrs a day.
5. Do water changes of 10gal every 4 days or so as to not shock the fish.
6. Use only a pinch of fish food, like Omega One Flakes. Only feed once a day. Some flake foods contain phosphates as preservatives. Check the Tetra label for phosphates!
7. Your pH is LOW, check your tap water for pH and if low or if you are using a water softener, then you might consider bypassing it somehow.
8. Setup and run an airstone ALL the time. Algae die off robs O2 from the water.
9. Whatever you do, don't use a water clarifier cause if the water does clear, you won't know what the real cause was.
10. After you do all the above, you might want to get an API Phosphate PO4 test kit. If you have high phosphates, which I suspect, then you can CUT them down easily by adding a second HOB fliter, like a Fluval 30 or 50 and pack it with API Ammo-Chips AND API Phos-Zorb.
11. You should also consider a power head to increase water flow, but heavy aeration might be enough.
12. You should also check the substrate for iron content. This will help the plants grow, so when things settle down and you have clear water, then you might not have to use so much ferts or CO2. Your plants are small and don't "really" need much now except the nitrates from the good bacteria.
13. When you do see plant growth, go easy on the ferts! (err on the side of less is more)
14. And whatever you do DON'T try to raise the pH with liquid chemicals! Shoot for a pH that's around 7.5. Then, the fish waste will naturally lower it. Then, you raise it back up again with WC's! Simple! The WC's alone should be enough to gradually raise the pH.

Presently, on my 37 gal, use two Fluval 50's. First is set up with Sponge, Bio-Max and Carbon. The second uses a Sponge, Ammo-Chips and Phos-Zorb pouches.

Good Luck! (I like your cats!)
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