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Thread: Lighting an Aquarium with PAR instead of Watts Reply to Thread
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  Topic Review (Newest First)
09-01-2016 03:51 PM
hachi Does anyone know what the PAR is like on the updated Fluval Spec V? Thanks.
03-13-2016 07:13 AM
jeffkrol
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeff5614 View Post

That's interesting being that ADA says their bulbs are 8000K and yet seem to grow plants well. My Kessils have an adjustable range of 6000 to 9000. I have them set in the middle of the range which, I would think, puts me at 7500 and I have no issues with growth. It makes me wonder how accurate the Kevin ratings are from all of the manufacturers.
Kelvin for certain types of lights (fluorescent,led, and MH for example) is an average.. therefore there is a very broad number of ind. "colors" and different intensities of each color that can create the same K value..
K and CCT are the same sort of..
Quote:
The correlated color temperature (CCT) is a specification of the color appearance of the light emitted by a lamp, relating its color to the color of light from a reference source when heated to a particular temperature, measured in degrees Kelvin (K).
Quote:
The correlated color temperature (CCT) designation for a light source gives a good indication of the lamp's general appearance, but does not give information on its specific spectral power distribution. Therefore, two lamps may appear to be the same color, but their effects on object colors can be quite different.
http://www.lrc.rpi.edu/education/lea...nology/cct.asp
03-13-2016 03:22 AM
Jeff5614
Quote:
Originally Posted by Diana View Post
The K value is a number that represents what the bulb will look like to our eyes. 8000K is decidedly toward the blue. Usually planted tanks do well with some of the red wavelengths and some of the blue. Usually about 6500K is about as high a K value that works for plants.
That's interesting being that ADA says their bulbs are 8000K and yet seem to grow plants well. My Kessils have an adjustable range of 6000 to 9000. I have them set in the middle of the range which, I would think, puts me at 7500 and I have no issues with growth. It makes me wonder how accurate the Kevin ratings are from all of the manufacturers.
03-13-2016 12:21 AM
Diana The K value is a number that represents what the bulb will look like to our eyes. 8000K is decidedly toward the blue. Usually planted tanks do well with some of the red wavelengths and some of the blue. Usually about 6500K is about as high a K value that works for plants.
03-12-2016 08:26 PM
Hoppy
Quote:
Originally Posted by Malin View Post
Did anyone ever check out the Aquael Leddy Tube 8000K? It looks interesting and I'm considering the 16W, but I can't find any information about PAR.

I need some more light for my 250l tank to supplement the 2xHagen Glo 39W, but I can't decide wether to buy another one or put in LED.
Wow! You must want really high light! A two bulb Hagen Glo light should be enough to grow most any plants. That size tank, with two 39 watt T5HO bulbs is sold as a reef tank, and reef tanks use a lot more light than planted tanks.
03-11-2016 04:41 PM
nofearengineer
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trigger334 View Post
Here's a recent article, which covers all the important aspects of aquarium LEDs, including PUR, and the science behind it. The website also reviews many of the more popular aquarium LEDs out.

LED Aquarium Lights,[censored]Lighting; How they work, DIY | Aquarium Article Digest

Here's a good review as well.


TMC AquaRay Vs. Build My LED | Marine Aquarium LED Study
Has Trigger mentioned that he wrote this review article? A bit disingenuous to post it as a reference without disclosing his bias.
03-11-2016 10:54 AM
Malin Did anyone ever check out the Aquael Leddy Tube 8000K? It looks interesting and I'm considering the 16W, but I can't find any information about PAR.

I need some more light for my 250l tank to supplement the 2xHagen Glo 39W, but I can't decide wether to buy another one or put in LED.
12-17-2015 06:46 PM
Trigger334 Those printed spectrum are rather misleading anyways. You might be interested in this.

12-17-2015 06:14 PM
jeffkrol THE reason I'm "hung up" on coloredLED's is fairly self explanatory from the above diagram btw:

now this "hang up" is BOTH for visual and plant benefits..

Soon all of this will be pointless as "true" high CRI diodes become more common..
BTW the Yuji uses "purple" as the base emitter not RB or blue..
Out of the 2 images below, which one will have better overall color rendition and cover all photosynthetic pigment peaks relatively even?







High CRI LED Lighting | Yuji LED

see a "one color" emitter I like..

BTW: so much for "secret sauce" 6500k emitters.. See you can teach old dogs new tricks..





NOW if you can get them to use cyan instead of green.. (to start) we'd be getting close to being on the same page..
NOTE: CREE dosn't "do" cyan AFAICT.. but Phillips does..
12-17-2015 05:53 PM
Trigger334 Jeff.

The GroBeam 1000 is not in production anymore. You will want to look at the GroBeam 1500 or Colorplus.

You certainly are set on emitters/spectrum. Fluval is a composite light as well. Meaning they mix white with colors to achieve their overall spectrum. Plus they have so many emitters, they have to be daisy chained together to keep the price low. Meaning the construction is among the poorest. No drivers, more watts, poor dimming method.

If the article was read, someone can see, that while they might get a decent spectrum, the fixture is set to fail in the near feature, which is why the warranty is so short. Dimming 0-10v with this many daisy chained emitters only increases the chances of fixture failure and gets higher and higher with more emitters. Fluval is one with the most emitters on the market. 0-10v applies so much stain to the circuity, more with more emitters, plus when moisture is involved, it's a set-up.

It does have a "moisture guard", I'll give it that, but is not waterproof. Working in the industry, I can't even count how many times people have moisture issues with LEDs. I cannot also count how many times people fixtures have ended up in the water. A IP waterproof rating is much more desirable then a moisture guard.

So, while the spectrum might be nice. If someone can swing it, they are far better off investing in better tech, that will last them longer. Having to replace even one of these fixtures after their short 6mo? warranty, will end up costing you more than a decent BML or AquaRay. I'd recommend a BML over a Fluval.

If even one emitter goes out on the fixture, that will shift the spectrum as well. Really messing with the real growing power of the blues and reds.

Can't remember, these have a fan? That would say something as well.

I can see why you are set on emitters and spectrum. You appear to be a DIY guy? Fun stuff, while you have more spectrum control (which is debatable as to what is best, considering nature as well), that's about all DIY has going for it. Maybe make certain colors pop to the eye. They don't even end up costing less and much more time is involved. With no moisture control and no warranty.

I still recommend people to read the article and learn the facts of an overall great LED.
12-17-2015 03:26 AM
jeffkrol you tell me which one is better..

12-17-2015 01:09 AM
Trigger334 Posting this for others who want to understand what makes a great LED.

Useful article, which goes over the science of what separates the different LEDs on the market.

LED Aquarium Lights,[censored]Lighting; How they work, DIY | Aquarium Article Digest
12-16-2015 11:48 PM
jeffkrol
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trigger334 View Post
You show me a better brand LED out... We can talk more.

Someone that does their homework will see AquaRay to be one of the best aquarium LEDs out.
One that is subjective.. 2) you got to be kidding??

Show me ONE piece of independent data that would support such nonsense...

THER IS NO perfect light.. Kessil as an example; Crappy choice of freshwater specrum spectrum and as cryptic as Aquaray.. All talk w/ no technical backing..

sure they "grow stuff" So will about a thousand candles.. Means nothing actually..


Photons are photons.. NONE are "magical bins"..
That is physics and science, not advertising voodoo..


besides, except for a few chouce LED's "just whites" (of almost any K have GIANT holes their spectrum..
Zero "violets", little cyan and little red above 650nm..

CREE family of whites (any brand is not different by much)





feel free to give me all the Aquaray data you have..

"better brand" is certainly subjective. As a personal choice I'd pick In no particular order), Radions, Reefbreeders, DsunY, Current plus PRO, MANY easy and cheap DIY's, Some t5's, and even a "modified" Beamswork over them..
There are different reasons for each choice..

until you can tell me WHY they are exclusive , don't even bother replying to me.. you are just shilling.. no more no less..
christmas sales down????

tired of fighting w/ reefers????
http://www.reefcentral.com/forums/sh...hlight=aquaray
12-16-2015 11:18 PM
Trigger334 OK...you're stretching to make points and pulling from resources, which we don't know the credibility or how it even relates to any aquarium LED on the market.

You show me a better brand LED out... We can talk more.

Someone that does their homework will see AquaRay to be one of the best aquarium LEDs out. A LED actually meant to be used over water, plus all the other perks.
12-16-2015 08:52 PM
jeffkrol Me doth think you protest too much.....

For fun;
http://www.mouser.com/pdfdocs/DS158.pdf
max 144lumens/watt..
i'll leave out the fact that 6500k is not "the ideal" color temp either..

just another opinion, not unlike mine..
Quote:
Yes. Bridgelux makes the best high-CRI white LEDs, but they're also ~29v at 700mA (and give over 1700 lumens), so you would need a different driver setup.

Cree makes high output LEDs, but their white LEDs that are readily available from places like RapidLED, LED group buy, etc are all low-CRI parts.

Lumileds chips have the same output as Cree, but their white LEDs are available in 85- and 90CRI versions and give excellent color.
soo "IF" they are using ..say.. high CRI "special CREE bins" then they should say so...
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