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Topic Review (Newest First)
11-08-2014 03:42 PM
TankFreak420
Quote:
Originally Posted by Raymond S. View Post
I do not understand why people don't realize that a rimless tank is a whole different tank from a tank/w a frame. The rimless tank needs a 100% solid supporting surface under the entire bottom of it. Just a small amount of sag and you break the bottom glass.
IMO 1/2" plywood is much too flexible for this.
Rimless tanks are built just the same as tanks with rims. I mean come on the rim is the last step. That and most rimless tanks I have see where tanks that just had there rims removed. Are you saying that a tank with a rim is fine to be supported by the edges, but if you remove that rim it somehow can't be supported by the edges? Only tanks that need full support under them are acrylic tanks, Joey has said it many times in his diy videos.
11-08-2014 03:15 PM
Raymond S.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hoppy View Post
Do rimless tanks have thinner glass bottoms than standard tanks? If not, then they can't require any more support than standard tanks. The bottom rim of a standard tank is what supports the bottom glass of those tanks. Substituting a stand, without a flat top shouldn't change anything.
I apparently am on my way towards finding out something new about these
"rimless" tanks. I don't think they have thinner bottom glass...but...
Question: Do they have a tempered bottom glass ? Regular tanks do and have
a sticker on the bottom glass so you won't try to cut that panel.
In fact, on another forum a video was shown in which a person loaded several flat stones into a 20g tank and then stood on top of them. Total weight being over 200Lb.
It was a link supplied as a reply to the question..."Do you think it's safe to have this much weight in this tank" and it showed a 20g regular tank/w a stone on top of some sub and the stone was 3/4 as tall as the tank.
Mostly I just feel that I have been shown proof that a regular style tank is strong enough to be supported only on the ends, but as of yet have no such proof in the rimless style.
No trying to be argumentative but rather just cautious for sake of the tank owners till shown some supporting evidence of structural soundness in the
rimless variety.
11-08-2014 12:59 PM
trailsnale xenaph, cool looking cat! what kind is it?
11-07-2014 09:16 AM
barakainus
Quote:
Originally Posted by Raymond S. View Post
I do not understand why people don't realize that a rimless tank is a whole different tank from a tank/w a frame. The rimless tank needs a 100% solid supporting surface under the entire bottom of it. Just a small amount of sag and you break the bottom glass.
IMO 1/2" plywood is much too flexible for this.
Sorry, but this is simply not true. Any glass tank can be supported just at its edges and do just fine. In fact, you can build multiple (full) tanks above each other as an aquarium wall without using any stand and some breeders actually do exactly that.
btw, rimless tanks can be supported only on two sides and be fine. Tanks with plastic rim usually need support on all 4 sides or the plastic will break.
11-06-2014 03:53 AM
TankFreak420 So wish I could do this type of stand on my new 120g. Even if it would handle it, I want to run a sump and hide it.
10-26-2014 09:05 PM
Xenaph I bought some wood merisier 1x5, i glue them toghetter and i also put between the tank a styrofoam.

The tank is rimless but it an acrylic not glass.
10-26-2014 11:55 AM
Xenaph What type of top you recommand ?

The first picture is very strong of the stand is on Level, the 4x4 est very strong.
10-25-2014 11:50 PM
Raymond S. That would be a whole different ball game. Especially the 3/4 ply. People don't realize the flex built into plywood. It has fantastic strength, but is more flexible than real boards are.
But once you went to 3/4 it became far less and the center brace removes the sagging in the very center also.
BTW the structural integrity of the stand pictured is 10 x stronger than the first pictured.
Here's a relevant question. Are any of the rimless tanks made/w tempered glass bottoms ?
10-25-2014 07:29 PM
Xenaph
Quote:
Originally Posted by Raymond S. View Post
I do not understand why people don't realize that a rimless tank is a whole different tank from a tank/w a frame. The rimless tank needs a 100% solid supporting surface under the entire bottom of it. Just a small amount of sag and you break the bottom glass.
IMO 1/2" plywood is much too flexible for this.
I always put a 3/4 plywood on the top and i will add a middle brace. I did a error on 1/2 in my last post.

My other stand have a 75P ada on 3/4 sheet of MDF + the garden mat.

10-25-2014 05:01 PM
Hoppy
Quote:
Originally Posted by Raymond S. View Post
I do not understand why people don't realize that a rimless tank is a whole different tank from a tank/w a frame. The rimless tank needs a 100% solid supporting surface under the entire bottom of it. Just a small amount of sag and you break the bottom glass.
IMO 1/2" plywood is much too flexible for this.
Do rimless tanks have thinner glass bottoms than standard tanks? If not, then they can't require any more support than standard tanks. The bottom rim of a standard tank is what supports the bottom glass of those tanks. Substituting a stand, without a flat top shouldn't change anything.
10-25-2014 02:13 PM
Raymond S. I do not understand why people don't realize that a rimless tank is a whole different tank from a tank/w a frame. The rimless tank needs a 100% solid supporting surface under the entire bottom of it. Just a small amount of sag and you break the bottom glass.
IMO 1/2" plywood is much too flexible for this.
10-25-2014 01:54 PM
Xenaph Here the semi-final product. I need to add a top, and panel.

10-19-2014 12:50 AM
LRJ
Quote:
Originally Posted by Xenaph View Post
With a rimless tank, i will not level up the 4x4. So do i need to add a crossbar in the middle or only the top of plywood 1/2 is enough strength with the 4x4 ?
What do you mean about leveling up the 4x4?

The stand as constructed is plenty strong to hold the weight of the tank. The issue with the frameless aquarium however is that the bottom panel of the tank needs to be supported. I ran into this issue with my tank, and I came to the conclusion that if the top panel is resting flush on the tops of the corner posts and the edge cross supports, then there's no need to add an additional cross support in the middle.
10-18-2014 07:38 PM
Xenaph
Quote:
Originally Posted by AnotherHobby View Post
Absolutely no glue necessary. These brackets with this design can hold far more than an aquarium.
With a rimless tank, i will not level up the 4x4. So do i need to add a crossbar in the middle or only the top of plywood 1/2 is enough strength with the 4x4 ?
10-18-2014 07:20 PM
hydrophyte
Quote:
Originally Posted by lochaber View Post
I'm wandering a bit off topic here, but how did that resin work for you?

If I ever get back to work on my project, I was thinking of using something pretty similar (maybe the same?) For coating a plywood enclosure.
Don't use the US Composites resin! It is cheap and there are many references to using it for building tanks, but it has important problems.

You will be much better off with a Polygem Zoopoxy product. Send them an email to explain what you are doing and they can recommend something.
This thread has more than 15 replies. Click here to review the whole thread.

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