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  Topic Review (Newest First)
04-03-2016 12:33 PM
seandelevan Boom...newt tanks


Bump: Another one from back in the day

03-27-2016 07:30 PM
ken123 New newt set-up, half bare bottom & half planted substrate...
02-22-2016 02:38 PM
ken123 WoW, just found this thread- thanks all.
01-18-2016 03:33 AM
DirtyMouse Hi sorry to drag up and old post, Im trying to find the rest of the information you posted. Just registered to post this
12-12-2012 12:15 PM
slowfoot I might separate him so I could monitor how much he's eating, but at this point I don't think the other newts are going to be affected. I'm sure they have parasites, too, but they are probably healthy enough to not be bothered by them.
12-12-2012 05:18 AM
Learner
Quote:
Originally Posted by slowfoot View Post
It's most likely a high parasite load. Wild caught animals are really dragged down by these. I've never had to dose one of mine with meds, so I don't have any good advice for that. I would try searching here for anyone else who had similar issues : http://www.caudata.org/forum/ But keep in mind that if he's weak, the meds could kill him Some people prefer to wait and see if the load goes down while in captivity.
Roger that. My research also confirms this hypothesis. I am not going to medicate at this time. Wondering if I should quarantine him in case of an outbreak. I read of several folks doing this but not with easterns. what would you do?
12-11-2012 02:17 PM
ZeeZ I just wanted to comment that you're giving out great information! I'm selling a newt but I've been referring people asking about it to your thread because people should know how to take care of one and I'd rather they learn beforehand.

Keep up the great work!
12-11-2012 11:36 AM
slowfoot
Quote:
Originally Posted by Learner View Post
Slowfoot,

One of my easterns almost always looks skinny. The others stay nice and plump........healthy and lookin great. The skinny one will eat just fine with the rest and then the next day he'll look skinny again. I feed them about 2-3 times a week, a varied diet of frozen blood worms, live red wigglers, strips of filleted / boneless herring, and frozen brine shrimp. he seems to act just like the others. any ideas??
It's most likely a high parasite load. Wild caught animals are really dragged down by these. I've never had to dose one of mine with meds, so I don't have any good advice for that. I would try searching here for anyone else who had similar issues : http://www.caudata.org/forum/ But keep in mind that if he's weak, the meds could kill him Some people prefer to wait and see if the load goes down while in captivity.
12-11-2012 04:22 AM
Learner Slowfoot,

One of my easterns almost always looks skinny. The others stay nice and plump........healthy and lookin great. The skinny one will eat just fine with the rest and then the next day he'll look skinny again. I feed them about 2-3 times a week, a varied diet of frozen blood worms, live red wigglers, strips of filleted / boneless herring, and frozen brine shrimp. he seems to act just like the others. any ideas??
12-10-2012 09:45 PM
Wy Renegade Nice info! Love your other tank thread, although it doesn't get much in terms of updates . Great to see you posting up such good info.
12-10-2012 08:30 PM
Fishies_in_Philly That's the one. I love how you did the hardscape on it. So simplistic, yet elegant

Now i want some newts, so i am watching this thread for the next few installments i am so happy we have a herp section. Last thing i need it to track another forum.....lol
12-09-2012 07:42 PM
slowfoot
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fishies_in_Philly View Post
Slowfoot, i saw this amazing paludarium for newts a while back. it was just some driftwood and great stuff in a corner of the tank, and a bunch of plants, if i recall. the thread was from about 2008. it was a gorgeous tank. was that yours?
Was it this one?

Attachment 58573

That's mine It's a great technique for maximizing the water area, while also not having to worry about water leaking into a 'dry' section because the land area sits above the water.

I'll get to how to set up a tank for newts in the next post or so - it's pretty simple really.

Common newts in the US (because I live here!):

If you branch out beyond the cheap wild-caught firebellies and Eastern newts, there are quite a few species available. I've divided them into groups just based on the type of set-up they are suitable for. Detailed caresheets for all of these species can be found at http://www.caudata.org/cc/ under the 'species' heading.

1. Species for fully aquatic set-ups /paludariums that are mostly water:

There are a number of species that need no true land area and should be fully aquatic as adults (juveniles go through a terrestrial eft stage) when living in good conditions. Most of these species need only plants growing to the top of the water or maybe a piece of driftwood breaking the surface to rest on occasionally.

Chinese firebelly
(Cynops/Hypselotriton orientalis): These are the little black newts with the red bellies sold most commonly in pet stores. They are pretty much never captive bred and always wild caught. When in good health, they might rest at the surface occasionally, but should not spend time out of the water. Very non-aggressive, and they don't get very big so they can be kept in small groups in smaller tanks (10 - 20 gallons).

Blue-tailed firebelly
(Cynops cyanurus) and Sword tailed newt (Cynops ensicauda): These are often available captive bred and are a great alternative to the Chinese firebelly (if you're willing to spend a little more to get a better pet). Their care is basically the same, although C. ensicauda can tolerate warmer temps.

Eastern newt (Notophthalmus viridescens): Little green newts from the Eastern US, pretty much never available as captive bred. (Most of mine are ) Also very aquatic as adults. I've kept mine in a paludarium set up and they never left the water, so the land area was mostly a waste of space. Have the same issues as all wild-caught animals - lots of disease and they tend to die unexpectedly.

Some of mine:

Attachment 58574
Attachment 58575
Attachment 58576

Japanese firebelly (Cynops pyrrhogaster): These used to be available as wild caught individuals in pet stores, but you almost never see them anymore. Available fairly often captive bred. Tolerate slightly warmer temps (into the mid to high 70s). I've had mine for over 20 years. These guys will sometimes use a land area, but they basically just slug around like awkward walruses for a while - smashing your plants - before diving back into the water. Can be kept in groups. These do get fairly large, so they prefer a larger water area.

My firebellies:

Attachment 58577
Attachment 58578

Spanish sharp-ribbed newt (Pleurodeles waltl): These guys are awesome! They just look super prehistoric and get quite large. Always captive bred in the US. There are even leucistic (white) individuals available for a little extra cash. Very easy to care for and very personable - I recommend them highly for people new to newts. Plus, they can push their ribs out through their skin to inject toxins when pissed. How cool is that? I should probably mention that these guys shouldn't be handled too often, or at least not enough to upset them

I'll have to stop there and continue later - family needs tending!
12-09-2012 06:21 PM
Fishies_in_Philly Slowfoot, i saw this amazing paludarium for newts a while back. it was just some driftwood and great stuff in a corner of the tank, and a bunch of plants, if i recall. the thread was from about 2008. it was a gorgeous tank. was that yours?
12-09-2012 05:53 AM
Learner I am attentive to this one SF. I have been doing a bunch of my own research now that I am housing a few RSN. Always nice to have an expert to follow along with. I will be planting my build this coming week!
12-09-2012 12:17 AM
QQQUUUUAADDD Could you tell us how to setup a planted tank with newts in it? I'm interested.
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