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Topic Review (Newest First)
12-11-2012 02:36 PM
Django
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kathyy View Post
Very glad to read that things are looking up.

My plants really hated 6 hour days. The Persicaria Kawagoeanum only carried ~6 leaves per stem, leaves were only a couple inches long and the lower leaves and stems had BBA on them. On 8 hour days the leaves are at least double the size, stems carry more than a dozen leaves and I am not seeing BBA on the old leaves. Sure hope that keeps up. I am sure the algae would love 8 hour days more if I didn't shade the tank. It makes a big difference. Put some window screen or cheesecloth over the tank and set the light for 8 hours. In a couple weeks take the shade off for an hour a day. If that goes well, 2 hours and so on. Since the plant mass is larger and plants themselves stronger they can handle the added light. I am up to 4 on/4 off as of last week.

But keep it at 6 hours for right now as it is working for you, just something to consider trying later on.
Thank you everyone for rplying. I guess now I'll work on NPK for awile to further allow the plants to grow better and try and stop algae breakouts. Also, I'd like to use my 13-watt CFLs too, I guess that's downthe road a bit, thoug.

Thanks again,
Django
12-09-2012 02:38 AM
Kathyy Very glad to read that things are looking up.

My plants really hated 6 hour days. The Persicaria Kawagoeanum only carried ~6 leaves per stem, leaves were only a couple inches long and the lower leaves and stems had BBA on them. On 8 hour days the leaves are at least double the size, stems carry more than a dozen leaves and I am not seeing BBA on the old leaves. Sure hope that keeps up. I am sure the algae would love 8 hour days more if I didn't shade the tank. It makes a big difference. Put some window screen or cheesecloth over the tank and set the light for 8 hours. In a couple weeks take the shade off for an hour a day. If that goes well, 2 hours and so on. Since the plant mass is larger and plants themselves stronger they can handle the added light. I am up to 4 on/4 off as of last week.

But keep it at 6 hours for right now as it is working for you, just something to consider trying later on.
12-09-2012 12:33 AM
Django Thanks for the reply Dave. I tried to increase the photoperiod from 6 to 8 hours and the algae started reappearing again (not very much, but still...). I put the photoperiod at 7 hours to see if that will work. However, although algae is always in the water, I think there must be something wrong with the system. I think that without something being wrong with my system, I would be able to increase the photoperiod more. I think there has to be something like too much dissolved organic matter or not enough NPK, which I don't dose, or something that's making it hard for the plants to grow and easier for the algae to take over. Anyway, that's just my take on it. See you.

Steven
12-07-2012 10:43 AM
Canuck Glad to hear your algae has died back. Water changes tend to be good in almost any situation. Personally, I still don't believe the Flourish had anything to do with your problems, but I'm not upset if you don't believe the same things I do. Time will tell. Good Luck!
12-07-2012 01:03 AM
Django I went back to the beginning and reread each of the posts. I would like to thank you for your advice.

So what finally killed the algae? To my mind, what impressed me as most useful were the 50% water changes (8), which certainly reduced the Flourish Comprehensive I had been unknowingly overdosing. Dosing can be hard - it's at the beginning when you know very little that you need the knowledge.

I have been working more on the Flourish dose, doing the math and the conversions. For my tank it looks like it's about 10 or 11 drops.

Thanks again,
Steven
12-07-2012 12:31 AM
Django Here's the pic. Somehow I think right after an algae infestation is not the best time to take a picture, but it shows it like it is. I lost a good deal of biomass, but you won't find very much algae in there. Should be a bit nicer-looking in a month or so. And no, those aren't coconuts in the wood, just some gravel that the Java Moss held onto.
12-06-2012 03:50 PM
Django I think the algae onslaught is over. There may be a piece or two but I haven't been able to find any algae that looks like it's on the way to taking over the world, so I think its over.

I know I should have stayed with the same photoperiod but I went up to 8 hours. We'll see if it's ok.

The solutions: I reduced my Seachem Flourish Comprehensive and this Jave Moss literally came up from under the gravel. It's all over now. Occurs to me that I should share a pic, so I'll do that tonight. One more thing or so - I have a glass top and I put plastic wrap over it to see if it reduces the light intensity, and I did plenty of 50% water changes. It really looks very good.

Thanks for the help,
Steven
12-03-2012 03:09 AM
Django Thank you for the input. I noticed that there is still a significant amount of 3rd stage Hair algae in the back with the Water Sprite where I hadn't looked. The BGA hasn't expanded from it's original spots, though, and that's good. I did a 50% water change. I have to get an algae scraper. I've been using a razor blade and it's a little uncomfortable. That might help.

I figured out my dosing amount. I'm using an eyedropper. For my 10g at 20 drops per 1/4 teaspoon:

From the directions on the bottle: 1/2 teaspoon per 30 gallons, I come up with 3.33 drops rounded up to 4 drops. I'm going to have to check it over again.

Awsome feedback!! Thanks!
12-02-2012 05:29 PM
Kathyy ^+1
Clean up the tank. Wipe down the tank to remove that glass algae. Pick out dead and damaged leaves, siphon off the very top layer of substrate to get some debris. Putting a prefilter sponge on the filter intake will catch a lot of debris as well. Take out the wood and scrub off the algae. Either pull up the wisteria and rinse off the leaf or remove the leaf if it looks damages. BGA coats healthy leaves too, it might be just fine under the stuff.

The tank may not have too much light for plants with enough nutrients but likely does for plants not getting enough of the basics. As well as increasing the dosing and using nitrate and phosphate you might consider putting a layer of window screen down to give the plants a break for a couple weeks. Get Excel too, it helps the plants two ways, kills many types of algae and provides carbon. You have some very good varieties for new tanks and once they get going you will be amazed.

None of this is extreme measures, you would keep doing it all for the life of the tank to some degree or another. You will have to dose the tank regularly, I do it daily when I feed the fish. Healthy leaves live longer but the more plant mass the more dead leaves will develop. Personally I like to have snails and platies eat the dead leaves before I have to do something about them. There will always be some algae somewhere but you will have to search for it among the thick growth of healthy plants and can pick off isolated leaves. Glass will get covered with algae but may need to be wiped monthly instead of twice a week. Since it is easy for me to do water changes I do large ones regularly. When I had a 10 gallon tank lit with compact fluorescents I did do 50% weekly water changes and with the Excel and complete fertilizing the tank was clean and plants looked great.
12-02-2012 02:13 PM
Canuck A couple of observations which you can feel free to ignore, some may not "agree" with a lot of people believe to be true.

A.) New planted tanks (especially set up by people with limited experience) tend to go through waves of algae infestations. These have a tendency to straighten themselves out. The kicker is people are doing all kinds of weird and wonderful things to their tanks at the time (to rid themselves of their problems). Fertilizing more, fertilizing less, adding CO2, playing with their lights, etc., whichever they happen to be doing when the problem solves itself is attributed with curing their algae problem. New tanks take more work, more cleaning and more care. Do this and exercise a little patience, a lot of problems disappear on their own.

B.) Grow plants. Plants need light, CO2, and ferts. Light can be problematic, almost everyone seems to use much more light then they need and a lot less CO2 and ferts. I don't think you have too much light, so I'd start by concentrating on the second two. Could just be the pics you've posted but your plants look a little pale to me. This could be lack of CO2, lack of ferts or a combination of the two. If it were my tank I'd add either CO2 or Excel (or substitute). I'd also add macros (nitrogen, potassium and phosphate). Give the plants whatever they need to grow.

C.) Balance is a meaningless buzzword used by too many people. Don't be scared of ferts or CO2. I've never seen any evidence that overdoing them has caused any problems in any of my tanks. You CANNOT starve algae. You CAN starve plants. An aquarium is always going to have more then enough nutrients to sustain an algae outbreak. And starving (dying) plants are fuel for algae outbreaks. So don't worry about over-fertilizing. I can't say what would happen if you dumped a whole bottle of Flourish in a tank, but short of that 2 or 3 or 4 times the recommended dose won't cause any problems in an otherwise well run tank. There is no magic ratio! And as an aside Flourish Comprehensive is not comprehensive, there are not enough macros in it to sustain a planted tank. The product is essentially designed for a fish tank with a couple of plants.

D.) Use lots of plants. Tanks with a large plant biomass are a lot easier to run then tanks with less plants. Some people attribute this to competition for nutrients. Every successful EI tank proves this theory wrong. Lifeforms (algae and plants, in our case) compete to dominate systems. I haven't heard a theory that I believe, on how they compete but they do. Most of the tanks that are algae free that you see on this site and others have large amounts of healthy growing plants. Now check out the pics of tanks of people who are having problems. You will almost invariably see a lot fewer plants. I believe your tank would benefit from some more fast growers. Pack it full until the time the tank stabilizes, then you can remove, or change out plants, as you wish.

Hope this helps some. As a point of comparison, I have a 10 gallon with 2 13 watt cfl bulbs. This tank wouldn't have any greater light levels then yours since they are just stuck in an incandescent hood. I've played with the tank a lot. I've run it with DIY CO2 and ferts with no algae. I've run it with excel and ferts with no algae. I miss water changes. For some periods, I fertilize religiously (3 times a week, full EI). Some times I get lazy and only fert once a week. This tank is mature, so I have a lot more leeway with it then you have with yours. Point is, with a little work now, fert regularly, clean religiously, provide steady amounts of carbon, your tank will get to the same point.
12-02-2012 12:43 AM
R.sok I think you should dose c02 & add some faster growing plants. I barely have any flow with a biocube 8gallon running 1 15watt 6500cfl & 1 13 watt 6500 cfl with very minimal algae. I Used to have slight algae problems, but then i started doing diy c02 & added some floaters & it took care of the problem
11-30-2012 11:57 AM
Django
When It Rains...

You may have heard me asking around about Hair algae in my liitle 10g lately. Well, just as it's on its way out, I am seeing Blue-green algae, otherwise known as Cyanobacteria popping up in a couple of places. I'll have to post a pic of my tank, although you may not see the BGA Try looking at the top of the wood and through the hole in the wood, where there's a bit of Java Moss that's affected. Also, look at the leaf to the right of the little powerhead.

http://www.plantedtank.net/forums/at...1&d=1354274875

http://www.plantedtank.net/forums/at...1&d=1354274875

As you can see, I just put in a powerhead in the second side of the tank. Maybe there isn't enough water flow up by the top of the wood either. I guess that advice helped, because I'm really not into putting any antibiotics or chemicals into the tank yet.

Most of the plants aren't doing so well or growing so well, so I wonder if it has anything to do with macro or micro ferts. I had an overdose of Flourish Comprehensive before all the algae got going, and I did 7 50%'ers which helped, and the planted Water Sprite and the Wisteria came to life. This has been going on for at least a month or a month and a half. So I'm thinking, "Are the ferts too low now or haven't I done enough water changes?" Maybe you can give me some other advice... any will be much appreciated. Thanks.

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