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Topic Review (Newest First)
11-20-2012 10:01 PM
OVT I have tiger lilies that I keep in my nanos @ ~4-5" tall: plant a bunch of plants around them to restrict their root system. In my 65G I have one that is 18" cubed - just removed 10+ leaves from it last night. So, you can have what you want
11-20-2012 09:12 PM
tylergvolk
Quote:
Originally Posted by OVT View Post
Until a ~1 year ago I used to have a similar tank (22g) going for ~ 6 years. It was one of my least problematic tanks, 99.9% algae free. The major difference that just jumped out at me was that you only have 3 species of plants that are not known for being fast growers. I am thinking that different plants consume nutrients in (slightly?) different amounts and at different rates.

That tank was relatively over-stocked: 12 black neons, 4 ottos, a beta, 4-5 black mollies, etc. And I always tend to over-feed - by a lot.

So, if you can find a faster growing plant or 2 that would fit into your scape, the 'balancing' will get better.

Thanks for your input. I do like the Tiger Lilly but I hear that they dominate tanks...
11-20-2012 07:12 PM
OVT Until a ~1 year ago I used to have a similar tank (22g) going for ~ 6 years. It was one of my least problematic tanks, 99.9% algae free. The major difference that just jumped out at me was that you only have 3 species of plants that are not known for being fast growers. I am thinking that different plants consume nutrients in (slightly?) different amounts and at different rates.

That tank was relatively over-stocked: 12 black neons, 4 ottos, a beta, 4-5 black mollies, etc. And I always tend to over-feed - by a lot.

So, if you can find a faster growing plant or 2 that would fit into your scape, the 'balancing' will get better.

11-20-2012 02:00 PM
somewhatshocked This is a myth that's been repeatedly debunked. Please see EI dosing for evidence.

There are several factors that play into algae problems. The three main factors being levels of lighting, amounts of CO2 in the water column and plant mass.

Quote:
Originally Posted by BBradbury View Post
Fish and plants are very small and need very little food. Most water keepers feed too much, so they have algae problems. Closely monitor how much food goes into the tank, if you feed more than a little twice a week, then you're likely feeding too much.

B
11-19-2012 03:04 PM
tylergvolk Today, I started dosing about half of that was listed above in the chart. Co2 in this tank is strong. yellow/green. I guess I will just sit back and watch and see what happens.

I also am going to try and feed a lot less. Just a tiny tiny bit twice a day.
11-19-2012 12:59 AM
Bluek24a4
Quote:
Originally Posted by tylergvolk View Post
I think I should continue to NOT does any fertilizers and turn the co2 up slowly and see what happens. What do you think?
Do not do that. Keep dosing and up the CO2. Upping CO2 with no ferts is useless.
11-19-2012 12:48 AM
tylergvolk Bump.
11-18-2012 04:28 PM
tylergvolk
Quote:
Originally Posted by somewhatshocked View Post
When you use CO2, your plants require ferts.

What plants do you have and how many of them do you have? How much, what kind and how often are you fertilizing?

You're experiencing algal blooms because of an imbalance between lighting, CO2 and ferts. Once we know more about what's in your tank and what you're adding, TPT folks will be able to give advice.

It's not because you're feeding too much or you'd have other issues.
Okay, I appreciate any advice and I am ready to tackle the problem.

1) HC carpet, Dwarf Sag, and just added Rotala Colorata recently. (Pictures In Signature)

2) I was dosing SeaChem Flourish, Excel, Nitrogen, and Iron but I completely stopped 2 weeks ago and I'm still getting algae blooms. I was dosing accordingly:



Note: I no longer have the moss tree in this tank. Instead I have added the Rotala. I hope this helps TPT people to assist me. Thanks.
11-18-2012 04:11 PM
somewhatshocked When you use CO2, your plants require ferts.

What plants do you have and how many of them do you have? How much, what kind and how often are you fertilizing?

You're experiencing algal blooms because of an imbalance between lighting, CO2 and ferts. Once we know more about what's in your tank and what you're adding, TPT folks will be able to give advice.

It's not because you're feeding too much or you'd have other issues.
11-18-2012 03:22 PM
tylergvolk How much is food considered a little and how much is too much?
11-18-2012 03:08 PM
BBradbury
Algae Question

Hello tyler...

You have a high tech tank. Mine are low tech, no CO2 or any "bells and whistles". What I can tell you is if you have more food dissolved in the water then your fish and plants use, then this is the perfect environment for algae.

Plants simply need water, light and nutrients for growth. If you limit one of them, then you control growth. Nutrients is the easiest to change. I have no visible algae in my tanks, because there are no added nutrients in the water to sustain it.

Fish and plants are very small and need very little food. Most water keepers feed too much, so they have algae problems. Closely monitor how much food goes into the tank, if you feed more than a little twice a week, then you're likely feeding too much.

B
11-18-2012 02:48 PM
tylergvolk
Balancing My Aquarium

I need some insight on my way of balancing my aquarium. I will try and keep this short and straight to the point for times sake

Biocube 14g
-PAR 50-60 [Medium Light]
-Strong Flow
-Eco-Complete
-Stable Pressurized Co2
-No signs of nutrient deficiencies ever

*The problem is I get blooms of green algae periodically on the glass of this aquarium. 2 weeks ago I stopped dosing because I thought that was the problem. Nope, I am still getting algae blooms. They are not huge but I want to minimize them further.

Now. I am convinced it is my co2 which I always kept stable but here is the kicker. I can turn up my co2 until my drop checker is yellow and the fish are not effected. There must me a high oxygen content in the water due to the filtration in the back. In the back of my aquarium, the water falls from chamber one into a 3 stage filter, Mechanical, Carbon, and Biomax. Then, it flows into chamber 3 and into the return.

I think my algae problem is due to my co2. What do you think? I think I should continue to NOT does any fertilizers and turn the co2 up slowly and see what happens. What do you think? If I do this, I will be pumping A LOT of co2 in the tank like almost 10bps or more...

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