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Thread: The Importance of CO2 in a Planted Tank Reply to Thread
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Topic Review (Newest First)
12-06-2012 12:55 PM
ZLogic Decide what you have to commit to the tank. If you have the time to commit to pruning and the money to commit to the initial cost of tank, regulator, and solenoid then go for it. You would also need to invest in ferts and set up a dosing schedule because the accelerated growth from the co2 injection would cause a higher demand for nutrients. There aren't many plants that actually require high light and co2 and if you wanted to try those plants it would be worth the investment, but if you're a casual hobbyist, low light/no co2 is a pretty safe bet. DiY co2 is a happy medium where ferts are beneficial, but not as strict. My issue with DiY is the possibility of fluxuations in co2 levels that will lead to algae. For me personally, i work about 60 hours a week plus i have a toddler so much of my time is already occupied. I stick with low light, weekly fert dosing, no co2 and bi-weekly water changes, if that. Keep it! adequately stocked and your fauna will provide your flora with everything they need.
12-06-2012 02:22 AM
talontsiawd
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vincent Tran View Post
Yes, some plants NEED the addition of Co2 to even live. These are usually carpet plants. Otherwise "low-light" plants just grow slower without additional co2.
I disagree. I don't love this scape but here is an old tank of mine. 10 gallon, seriously underfilter, no real ferts, no excel on a regular, no co2 at all.

This is where I started:


This is where I ended:


Quote from myself in my thread:
"This has been the easiest tank I have ever dealt with"
12-05-2012 06:54 PM
puopg Hey all,
It has been about 2 months since and with my DIY setup, i have been able to achieve decent CO2 levels but i have decided to move to pressurized CO2 for a few reasons. Recently i began EI, and the first thing i noticed was my CO2 indicator fluctuates from green in morning to blue green at the end of the day. From my experience, DIY output is not large enough at least with a plastic bottle. Second, There is no control i have over the amount of CO2 and consistent CO2 levels are key to preventing algae and promoting good growth. I have definitely been learning loads about plant health, the hobby, and where i want to go (aquascaping competitions) over the past 2 months. From common sense, i think my lights and ferts are good so the only thing that is stunting my growth from what i see is my CO2 and i will update how the pressurized system goes. Seems like its time to make a ton of desserts with all this sugar XD.
10-14-2012 05:53 PM
puopg I do have a drop checker and it is green . i adjusted the amount of yeast to produce the right amount of CO2 for my tank. I run it at night so in the morning the thing is light green and then at the end of the day it turns turquoise.

And for the price, if we exclude the equipment, the sugar and yeast is like almost free since i use ~ 1/4 tsp yeast every 1.5 weeks, and 1 cup of sugar at that time. COSTCO sells a fukton of sugar for like $11. OBVIOUSLY, if your tank is larger, proper CO2 levels would be much harder to achieve than in my 10 gallon.

CO2 is not necessary unless you have a more particular plant. You can have a very nice tank especially small if you choose to not run CO2. I did that for a month but the picture of coming home to a tank that has air bubbles on every leaf is so cool. Also, tells me my plants aren't sleepin on the job.
10-12-2012 05:57 PM
Knotyoureality I've got high-light recommended stems happily growing in low/medium light, no c02. Do they show the full potential of their color? Nope. But they're still very nice plants and this way I'm able to keep some relatively hard to find plants on hand until I *am* ready to set up a high tech tank.

My hygro sunset under c02/high light/ferts would have a bushier growth pattern, larger leaves, and brilliant pinks. Under my med light/med ferts set up the leaves are a little smaller, the sections between nodes are longer and the pink is diminished to a light blush on the upper half of the plant. Still a good looking plant that I'm able to regularly harvest clippings from.

My baby tears carpet (nearing 75% coverage after 2+months) doesn't get as much horizontal growth as it would hi-tech, but I'm willing to wait it out. Hi-tech I'd be pruning and tossing the clippings. Low tech I'm pruning and re-planting the clippings.
10-12-2012 05:41 PM
plantbrain
Quote:
Originally Posted by pejerrey View Post
Is not optional with medium to high light
Certainly not optimal, but certainly possible; I ran 2 gal worth of DIY yeast and sugar for this tank for 4 years:

90 Gal with 350 Watts of MH's.




That said.....I would not recommend it to anyone.
Get a gas tank and reg, solenoid and a good needle valve
10-12-2012 06:33 AM
golfer_d Thanks, that is what I thought but wasn't sure it was fully making sense to me!

I am going to start out with a low tech one and see how it goes for now.
10-12-2012 06:27 AM
Vincent Tran Yes, some plants NEED the addition of Co2 to even live. These are usually carpet plants. Otherwise "low-light" plants just grow slower without additional co2.
10-12-2012 04:20 AM
starrlamia
Quote:
Originally Posted by golfer_d View Post
So it is just used basically to help plants grow quicker?

Or some plants really do need it to even grow at all?
All plants need it, and it is present in all tanks, however plants can only grow so much when you limit their needs (light, food, co2). Plants that need higher light will need more co2 than is in your tank normally so you would need to add it. Hopefully that makes sense

Sent from my Nexus S using Tapatalk 2
10-12-2012 04:14 AM
golfer_d So it is just used basically to help plants grow quicker?

Or some plants really do need it to even grow at all?
10-12-2012 04:13 AM
starrlamia
Quote:
Originally Posted by pejerrey View Post
Is not optional with medium to high light
You're right, but that is easy to remedy. :P

Sent from my Nexus S using Tapatalk 2
10-12-2012 04:07 AM
pejerrey
Quote:
Originally Posted by starrlamia View Post
You don't need it in any size tank if you don't want it. I'm happy with my slower growth =less maintenance.

Sent from my Nexus S using Tapatalk 2
Is not optional with medium to high light
10-12-2012 04:02 AM
starrlamia
Quote:
Originally Posted by golfer_d View Post
What about no CO2?

In a small tank, with low light plants, the CO2 isn't really required is it?

I am new to all of this and it is mind boggling the amount of info in these forums. If I am not expecting record setting growth, and my tank isn't large (say 10 gallons), do I really need the CO2?
You don't need it in any size tank if you don't want it. I'm happy with my slower growth =less maintenance.

Sent from my Nexus S using Tapatalk 2
10-12-2012 03:42 AM
golfer_d What about no CO2?

In a small tank, with low light plants, the CO2 isn't really required is it?

I am new to all of this and it is mind boggling the amount of info in these forums. If I am not expecting record setting growth, and my tank isn't large (say 10 gallons), do I really need the CO2?
10-12-2012 03:41 AM
Vincent Tran
Quote:
Originally Posted by tetra73 View Post
Oops, you are right. However, that $5 sugar/yeast CO2 won't last for few months. Couple of weeks top, assuming we are talking about just one bottle. Generally, in a larger tank, something bigger than 20g, the cost is no longer cost effective.
He has a ten gallon, and I actually used to use DIY Co2 on my ten gallon too. I bought a $4 bag of sugar and I only used a quarter in the month and a half I kept the Co2 going. I had a very high bubble count also. I think that too many people are scared to use DIY Co2 because it is "obsolete." For a ten gallon tank, I believe that changing the mixture every two weeks isn't so bad. The only reason I stopped using Co2 was because I got tired of having to constantly trim plants, which is pretty evident that it worked well for me. Don't get me wrong, if you have the money, pressurized is the way to go. It's precise, constant, and easy. But for tanks under ten gallons or for just testing out Co2, DIY is great!
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