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Topic Review (Newest First)
09-09-2014 01:03 PM
FatherLandDescendant
Quote:
Originally Posted by gpeach View Post
We have a planted tank with GD algae. Found a reference on the fish channel - they said to scrape with a razor blade because algae eaters have a hard time eating it. We bought a paint scraper and it scrapes off the glass easily, and now its under control.
Be careful not to scratch your tank
09-09-2014 12:42 PM
gpeach
Getting rid of GD

We have a planted tank with GD algae. Found a reference on the fish channel - they said to scrape with a razor blade because algae eaters have a hard time eating it. We bought a paint scraper and it scrapes off the glass easily, and now its under control.
12-18-2012 09:27 PM
kwisatz
GDA = Chlamydomonas and/or Ankistrodesmus

Quote:
Originally Posted by Denis Onii View Post
Tom, it has been identified under a scope as Chlamydomonas, thats not to say it's right. A quick search through multiple search engines and algaebase suggest that there is no such thing as Akineoscedesmus, do you have any links?
I think it should be not Akineoscedesmus, but Ankistrodesmus (which belongs to the same class as Chlamydomonas => Chlorophyta > Chlorophyceae).

Still I know of some professors who identified this "green dust algae" on the glass of freshwater aquarium as "Chlamydomonas" also. I'm not saying that Tom Barr did not have Ankistrodesmus under his microscope, but our GDA could be Chlamydomonas as well as Ankistrodesmus.
08-31-2012 08:00 AM
Rony11 I did everything that was adviced in this thread it took some time but now I am able to control the green spot algae. This is what I did..

1.Water changes 50% every weekend.
2.Reduced the light to 0.8 w/l - reduced light hours to 7 hours on a timer.
3.Cleaned the affected glass with miracle sponge and pruned the plant leaves affected with green spot algae.
4.I've improved my tank water circulation by cleaning the external filter, started cleaning the ceramic rings and changing the perlon once in two months in my external filter. I clean the spray bar once a week, prune my fast growing plants on a weekly basis, siphoning the debris which accumulates at corners on a weekly basis, cleaning the glass which had green spot algae once a week.
5. I reduced my fertilizing routine from everyday to twice a week.
6. Abt. CO2 I dont use the atomizer anymore. I added a good ceramic diffuser and clean the ceramic disc on weekly basis. I have 2 bubbles per second.

I still have green spot algae but it is not as irritating (spreading like crazy) as it was in the past. I can see the difference and I must say thanks to everyone who gave me gr8 advice.
05-17-2012 10:05 PM
Denis Onii I am usually inclined to believe Tom, but he is talking about a genus not a species or strain so it's difficult to believe Akineoscedesmus could exist yet have absolutely no mention on the internet across multiple search engines and algae resources. Maybe he spelt it wrong. Alga does get moved about and renamed a fair bit, perhaps it got recategorized as one of the 500 or so Chlamydomonas species. It's also hard to identify some algae using a microscope alone. If you scrape GDA off the glass you won't see a flagella because this gets absorbed so it appears as a green cell, like alot of other algae.

I hope he can provide some evidence for it's existance.
05-17-2012 06:27 PM
HD Blazingwolf
Quote:
Originally Posted by Denis Onii View Post
Tom, it has been identified under a scope as Chlamydomonas, thats not to say it's right. A quick search through multiple search engines and algaebase suggest that there is no such thing as Akineoscedesmus, do you have any links?

Unfortunately. algae is like a well known bacteria. in layman's terms. you have cold bactera A. well it also has 3,479,587,912 different strains

i may be wrong but the only resulting search google may provide for that algae is because its a subspecies not completely categorized and explained.
i know nothing of this just my assumption as to why googl wouldn't return a search on a specific algae
05-17-2012 10:51 AM
Denis Onii
Quote:
Originally Posted by plantbrain View Post
GDA is NOT Chlamydomonas, it is actually Akineoscedesmus. If you take a sample, look under a scope, you will see this Genus. I have not found the species, I do not think it matters so much for us and it's tougher to ID.
Tom, it has been identified under a scope as Chlamydomonas, thats not to say it's right. A quick search through multiple search engines and algaebase suggest that there is no such thing as Akineoscedesmus, do you have any links?
05-17-2012 06:12 AM
plantbrain
Quote:
Originally Posted by Denis Onii View Post
GDA is related to ammonium. Increase efficiency of your filter or reduce feeding. Wiping it off isn't very effective - GDA is flagellated, all that survive scraping will return to the glass at night.
No, the 1st time I ever saw GDA the owner had a nice wet/dry filter..........

There was no NH4.

I've dosed NH4 and have large fish populations, never was bale to keep a culture for long except for one small tank.

Anyway, the OP posted about GSA, not GDA.
GSA is fairly well understood,: higher PO4 and higher CO2(not just one but both).

GDA is NOT Chlamydomonas, it is actually Akineoscedesmus. If you take a sample, look under a scope, you will see this Genus. I have not found the species, I do not think it matters so much for us and it's tougher to ID.
Sewingalot has a few pics of it and her method usign EM antibiotics worked for some folks, but not others. My method of letting it be and run the course and then cleaning after 20-30 days seems to have the highest success rate, but...there are plenty of folks that still had issues.
Hard to say what causes it, the observations are pretty wide, and I am not able to induce and maintain any cultures, without being able to do that, there's little one can do to test in situ on a planted tank.

So we cannot say much about cause nor cures. Folks can try a few of the methods to cure their own issues, I really do not fuss with that, I stick to good plant growth and good care of the plants, this works better than any algae trickery in the last 20+ years I've kept planted tanks.
05-17-2012 12:16 AM
HD Blazingwolf Ur leaving out a major factor. Plants fight a chemical war with algae much as ur body does to parasites and infections. Algae is an infection to plants therefor they release chemicals that inhibit growth of algae. Ina closed system it protects the tank. In open moving bodies of water. It just protects the individual plant. Unhealthy plants are unable to protect themselves if they are having trouble growing. This is why healthy plants usually mean a clean tank
05-16-2012 10:34 PM
Denis Onii
Quote:
Originally Posted by 150EH View Post
What?
Chlamydomonas is probably the most studied algae on planet. More is known about it than any other. It's used as a model because it's easy to to cultivate and has many aspects to it's physiology.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/s/ref=nb_sb_...omonas&x=0&y=0

GDA goes through it's daily cell cycle. Each adult cell will divide internally up to 3 times a day, producing 2, 4, or 8 zoospores. They break out and grow into adult cells. This is the algae's method of asexual reproduction and it repeats continously *under favourable conditions*.

Eventually the number of cells will increase and the glass will go green. During the (subjective) night, the cells produce a substance that is responsible for them sticking to the glass. Flow in the tank will push more cells onto/passed certain spots and they will build up.

http://www.plantphysiol.org/content/....full.pdf+html

How long it takes before you see this buildup depends on level of ammonium, intensity of light, presence of calcium, temperature (apparently 33 celsius will halt the cell cycle completely!), possibly flow and as always, other stuff! You can slow this process down by reducing light intensity and reducing ammonium but you can also halt it.

To do this you can provoke the adult cell it into it's sexual cycle. There it will eventually end up as spores, no longer dividing asexually and effectively frozen in time. To achieve this, you have to subject it to unfavourable conditions which is known to include removal of ammonium (but might include other sources of N also).

http://pcp.oxfordjournals.org/content/33/7/909.abstract
(and others)

Now, the adult cell no longer divides into zoospores, but instead divides into gametes. These burst out, swim around and pair with each other, grow into a zygote and turn into a zygospore. You can tell when this has happened because the GDA will go a reddish colour due to oils and starch being stored in the spore.

This is a know method to get rid of GDA. Leave it for 3 weeks, let it go red, clean it out then it won't come back. This doesn't always work, possibly because it only works when GDA is in it's sexual cycle, ie in the absence of ammonium. If you have ammonium in your tank, you will be stuck in the perpetual cell cycle of asexual division.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Foh7osrNNZU

http://academic.kellogg.cc.mi.us/her...tions/0117.swf

http://sjbscience.weebly.com/uploads...domonas_v2.swf

It also uses phototaxis to swim toward the light in the day (to grow) and chemotaxis to swim toward a source of ammonium at night (to reproduce). Once it attaches to the glass it will divide. It does this at night to avoid UV damage during DNA replication - a feature that developed billions of years ago when the planet had little or no ozone and UV was far more dangerous.
05-16-2012 06:12 AM
Mr. Fish
Quote:
Originally Posted by 150EH View Post
What?
+1 LMAO
05-16-2012 04:55 AM
150EH
Quote:
Originally Posted by Denis Onii View Post
GDA is related to ammonium. Increase efficiency of your filter or reduce feeding. Wiping it off isn't very effective - GDA is flagellated, all that survive scraping will return to the glass at night.
What?
05-16-2012 02:55 AM
Mr. Fish Some of the info given here is incorrect.

GSA is generally caused by low phosphate levels. Also Low CO2 and poor water flow. Too long of a lighting period doesn't help either.

Firstly I would make sure your co2 levels is reading 30ppm and make sure your water flow is not restricted. If everything is in check I would dose a bit more of phosphate and wipe it down or add a cleanup crew to keep in check.
05-15-2012 08:40 AM
Denis Onii
Quote:
Originally Posted by 150EH View Post
My algae is under control to the point that I only have a very slight amount of dust that is not visible unless you look hard and the MagFloat takes it right off.
GDA is related to ammonium. Increase efficiency of your filter or reduce feeding. Wiping it off isn't very effective - GDA is flagellated, all that survive scraping will return to the glass at night.
05-15-2012 03:05 AM
150EH Or you might split the difference and reduce the photo period to 8 hrs. and you should be adding one third phosphates to your ferts so if you were adding 10 teaspoons of KNO3 you would then mix in 3.33 teaspoons of KH2PO4 to you solution or how ever you might do it. I used to use a UV sterilizer but they are expensive and don't last a long time so I find it better to just find the problem and make the corrections and most of the time if you just make the proper adjustment and watch for a couple of weeks you'll get results.

My algae is under control to the point that I only have a very slight amount of dust that is not visible unless you look hard and the MagFloat takes it right off.
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