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Thread: TDS (Total Dissolved Solids) & It's importance in Shrimp Rearing Reply to Thread
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  Topic Review (Newest First)
10-25-2011 03:57 PM
MsNemoShrimp
Quote:
Originally Posted by mordalphus View Post
Correct, TDS is a total of all things dissolved into the water. IE, fertilizers, trace minerals and salts. That includes your GH and KH. If you were to test just GH and KH, they're 17.9 ppm per degree. So 179 GH and 0 KH would be 10 GH

So if you know your GH and KH, just multiply by 17.9.

So if you know your GH is 10, and KH is 0, and your TDS is 250, you know that only 180 TDS of that is GH, the other 70 TDS is other things in your water such as nitrates, potassium, phosphate, etc.
Thanks for the clarification Liam. I now have a firm grip on all this kH, gH and TDS...or so I think. Lol
10-22-2011 02:04 AM
mordalphus Correct, TDS is a total of all things dissolved into the water. IE, fertilizers, trace minerals and salts. That includes your GH and KH. If you were to test just GH and KH, they're 17.9 ppm per degree. So 179 GH and 0 KH would be 10 GH

So if you know your GH and KH, just multiply by 17.9.

So if you know your GH is 10, and KH is 0, and your TDS is 250, you know that only 180 TDS of that is GH, the other 70 TDS is other things in your water such as nitrates, potassium, phosphate, etc.
10-22-2011 12:21 AM
zdnet
Quote:
Originally Posted by NeoShrimp View Post
I want to bring up a topic that wasn't quite clear in this thread just so I can clarify.

There is NO direct correlation between TDS w/ kH or gH correct?

It seems to me that everyone who have a TDS of around 150-180ppm, their kH and gH values would be 0-1 & 4-5 respectively, but mine is more like 3-4 & 7-8
TDS measures water impurity. Among those things that affect impurity, only some of them affect kH or gH. Therefore, knowing the TDS alone, one cannot reliably tell the kH or gH.
10-21-2011 09:57 PM
Darth Toro I had a TDS of 150-180 with a gH of 2-3. I used the fluval shrimp mineral supplement to bring it up to 4 gH. Im still learning too. Just wanted to add my recent experience.
10-21-2011 09:43 PM
MsNemoShrimp I want to bring up a topic that wasn't quite clear in this thread just so I can clarify.

There is NO direct correlation between TDS w/ kH or gH correct?

It seems to me that everyone who have a TDS of around 150-180ppm, their kH and gH values would be 0-1 & 4-5 respectively, but mine is more like 3-4 & 7-8
10-19-2011 08:35 PM
MsNemoShrimp
Quote:
Originally Posted by mordalphus View Post
That all depends on how much of your TDS is organic waste. I've noticed with a clean tds of 180, that my babies grow extremely slow at 230 tds. That's just me though. It's something I've witnessed recently when I tried keeping a tank without water changes. Compared to a tank where bi-weekly water changes were done, the babies in the no-change tank are still 3-5mm after 8 weeks, and the babies in the normal tank grew normally. The only difference in tanks being the TDS of the water, the GH, KH and pH are the same.
Quote:
Originally Posted by mordalphus View Post
Mine are 8mm to 1.2 cm by that age. Hard to keep track of age, but the tank that hasn't had a water change in it, babies are all under 1cm.
Thanks for all this valuable information Liam. So when my CRS have babies in the future (crossing my fingers), I will make sure to change the water whenever the TDS reaches 220ppm.
10-08-2011 04:24 AM
mordalphus Mine are 8mm to 1.2 cm by that age. Hard to keep track of age, but the tank that hasn't had a water change in it, babies are all under 1cm.
10-08-2011 04:18 AM
jkan0228 So about how big is a CRS at 8 weeks?
10-08-2011 04:14 AM
mordalphus That all depends on how much of your TDS is organic waste. I've noticed with a clean tds of 180, that my babies grow extremely slow at 230 tds. That's just me though. It's something I've witnessed recently when I tried keeping a tank without water changes. Compared to a tank where bi-weekly water changes were done, the babies in the no-change tank are still 3-5mm after 8 weeks, and the babies in the normal tank grew normally. The only difference in tanks being the TDS of the water, the GH, KH and pH are the same.
10-08-2011 03:54 AM
jkan0228 What is the maximum TDS before you see reduced growth rate?
10-08-2011 03:18 AM
mordalphus Also, your 700 tds likely isn't hardness, it's likely mostly organic waste.

Are your babies growing at a normal rate? I'm guessing NOT, and that the babies stay small for a very long time. That would be caused from a buildup of waste.
10-08-2011 02:32 AM
zdnet I believe that is because stability is much more important than the actual value.
10-08-2011 02:20 AM
matti2uude Sorry I should've made my question more clear.
How come my crs are doing way better with tons of babies at Tds 700 compared to when it was Tds 200?
10-08-2011 12:35 AM
zdnet
Quote:
Originally Posted by matti2uude View Post
Before the summer I used to keep my Tds around 200 doing water changes with remineralized RO/DI water. I had hardly any baby crs survive. I stopped doing water changes and only top off with RO/DI water remineralized to 150 Tds. Since the change I have tons of babies surviving now but the Tds in my tank is at 700. Any explanation for this?
I suspect if you measure the mineral concentration of the tank water, it will show a very high level. One possible explanation is that the tank water had been evaporated at a much faster rate than that of the mineral usage. Therefore, while the volume of a top-up was the same as that of the evaporated water, the mineral in the top-up water was much more than the mineral that had been used up. Consequently, the top-up increased the mineral concentration (and TDS) of the tank. When you repeated the top-ups, TDS climbed.

To maintain a steady TDS, remineralize the top-up water _only_ when the tank water's mineral concentration is below the optimal level.
10-07-2011 09:00 PM
matti2uude Before the summer I used to keep my Tds around 200 doing water changes with remineralized RO/DI water. I had hardly any baby crs survive. I stopped doing water changes and only top off with RO/DI water remineralized to 150 Tds. Since the change I have tons of babies surviving now but the Tds in my tank is at 700. Any explanation for this?
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