Pygmy Chain Sword (Echinodorus tenellus)

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Pygmy Chain Sword (Echinodorus tenellus)


Information

Common Name: Pygmy Chain Sword
Proper Name: Echinodorus tenellus
Category: Rosette Plants
Temperature: 19 - 28 C
PH: 5.0 - 7.5
Lighting: Medium
Growth Rate: Medium
Difficulty: Easy
Origin: Americas
Position in Aquascape: Mid-Ground,Foreground
 
Junior Member
 
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One of my favorites!!! This little critter is dynamite! I planted two plants and within a week's time, they both produced runners, and I wake up to at least 3 new plantlets each morning! Needless to say, the gravel bed of my tank looks like its covered in the greenest of grass. My substrate is just your average gravel...no laterite, etc....and I use a dyi CO2 unit.
 
Planted Tank Enthusiast
 
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I was having trouble with this until I put some root tablets into the substrate and now its growing every day.
 
Abs
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does this can live with no ferts no co2 just fish only???
 
Algae Grower
 
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Yes, I can live without CO2 and fertilization. Medium light makes this plant grow big lush bushes. High light is not so good for it.
 
Planted Tank Enthusiast
 
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I tired micro sword with no good luck. i pick some of this up today, how fast will it grow with medium lighting in a 10g? or how long will it take for me to see a think carpet in a 10g.
 
Planted Tank Obsessed
 
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This a great carpet plant because it propagates really fast! It will need a good mineralized substrate, Co2 and high lighting for it to carpet, that is if you want it super thick and dense. As well it is a huge IRON hog, you have to give it a lot of IRON!!
 
Algae Grower
 
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How do you trim it? Just cut it like grass? I put one in my tank and a few of the blades are melting back. I want to try to save it.
 
Algae Grower
 
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Awesome carpet plant my tanks half way covered now liquid ferts dont seem to do anything for this plant. root tabs or nutrient substrate work best. API over the seachem ones seem to make them grow alot faster
 
Planted Member
 
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This is an amazing plant. With CO2 and low-medium light, it spreads quickly. Without CO2 its a slow grower and older growth will melt. Don't expect it to grow much without any CO2. I do have a nice carpet of it in a 10g that uses spiral CFL bulbs for light and no CO2 (it did have CO2 when it filled out to a carpet). To trim, just cut the runners and pull the plant out. There's no good reason for this unless you are selling, a plant is dying, or its growing out of the substrate for some reason. In high light this plant can turn pinkish and green. very nice looking.
 
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Echinodorus tenellus, known as "Pygmy Chain Sword" or "mudbabies", is a North American native plant with sparse, spotty distribution from New England along the coastal states to Texas, then northeast to Michigan, with the greatest concentration being in central and western Florida. Most other states within its range can only boast reports of Pygmy Chain Sword in one or two counties, with the entirety of Texas only showing records of it in seven scattered counties. All of Tennessee seems to be a gaping hole in the center of its range. Surprisingly, wet, soggy Louisiana, likely second only to Florida regarding invasive aquatic species, has observance of E. tenellus in only one parish, that being Tangipahoa. Legally, it is listed as "Endangered" in Connecticut, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky and Michigan, but considering its extremely limited occurrence, perhaps it might be better for hobbyists to not collect this species from the wild at all, even should they come upon it in locations where there are no legal limitations. I, personally, have not collected this plant, and although it is within what I consider my "scouting range", considering its rarity, I will not be collecting it locally if I do find it. I will, however, be sure to alert authorities if I locate it in an area where it has not previously been recorded. I do plan on purchasing it or receiving a RAOK of it from a cultivated source in the near future. Other species of Echinodorus found in North America include the native E. floridanus, the Florida burhead, found only in the west end of Florida, in Escambia County; this species is listed as "Endangered", so treat it appropriately (in other words, don't mess with it!). E. berteroi, known as upright burhead, has a scattered reported range from Florida north to Ohio, west and north to Wisconsin, Iowa and South Dakota, southwest to Utah, Nevada and California, South and East along the border states to Florida, excluding Wyoming and Colorado. (This plant is most likely native to northern Mexico as well, and possibly further south, but this information is not included on the USDA site.) Legally, E. berteroi is listed as of "Special Concern" in Tennessee (under the synonym E. rostratus), "Threatened" in Kentucky, and "Endangered" in Ohio (E. rostratus), so act responsibly in these states. Also, Echinodorus ranunculoides, more properly known as Baldellia ranunculoides, or "lesser waterplantain", has been introduced into Thurston County, Washington, and also into Newfoundland and Labrador, but seeing as it is able to become established in such northern latitudes, it is likely not a candidate for warmer aquariums.

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