Water Hyacinth (Eichornia sp.)

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Water Hyacinth (Eichornia sp.)


Information

Common Name: Water Hyacinth
Proper Name: Eichornia sp.
Category: Flowers
Temperature: 5 - 24 C
PH: 5 - 8
Lighting: Medium
Growth Rate: Very Fast
Difficulty: Easy
Origin: South America
Position in Aquascape: Floating
Description  
Planted Tank VIP
 
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Water Hyacinth consists of seven species types which are all native to South America. It is one of the fastest known growing plants. It can double it's population in 2 weeks. They can become a major problem when not properly controlled creating breeding grounds for mosquitoes and using up valuable natural resources.
 
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Should you choose to dispose of this plant, do so in a manner that will ensure it will not propagate in the wild; freeze it or let it dry out.
 
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i have tried to grow a couple of species of floating [I]Eichornia[/I]. i would not say that their aquarium culture is "easy". the plants that i had all declined over time. i think that it is difficult to provide the bright light that they require in a tank.
 
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water hyacincth is SO illegal here in FL
 
Algae Grower
 
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but its all over florida lol almost every pond i come across has some in there
 
Algae Grower
 
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...And it DESERVES to be illegal. In India, where I come from, this stuff is a DISASTER. It's taken over ponds and streams. It chokes the waterways, leaving behind rotting swamps.... Kill it on sight!!
 
Abs
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wanna throw it away in our country one of major causes of floods! Blocks waterways and canals
 
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Well aside form it being an invasive species as mentioned above.. This is wonderful plant!!!!! I havent had any luck growing it in an aquarium, But I do have it floating as a sort of top level centerpiece in quite a few of my "fishbowls" I have lying around. They get alot of sunlight during the day and make a wonderful impression.. plus its also nice to have them bloom around the house throughout the year!!
 
mr2
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I too was unable to grow them in the aquarium, they slowly began to rot and die. I put them in a bucket out on my deck and they grew back right away. I have very bright lights over my aquarium fwiw.
 
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The reason they die is because natural sun has more power than any other bulb. In outdoor ponds they grow 2 feet tall!
 
Algae Grower
 
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They require a lot of light, even in a pond they will not grow and die off if it is too shaded to control the water temperature. You are better off using a shaded fountain or waterfall instead a stream to circulate the water so it cools better while still maintain sunlight in the main pond. Also, make it DEEP. The fish will just swim in the cooler lower water in the summer. Same for Water Lettuce, Lilies and most "pond" plants. I have both a pond and and some aquariums.
 
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The common water hyacinth, Eichhornia crassipes, (yes, two h's is correct) has made quite an impression on authorities all over North America, and hasn't been an ideal representative of its family. This plant has proven itself to be extremely invasive whenever it has found its way into the environment in several states. Much anecdotal evidence has been given about the extent of the problems it has caused in several locations, and the stern legal steps that have been taken by some states reflect those experiences. E. crassipes, has been introduced in many states, and most states whose climate doesn't provide an annual killing-back of the pest by freezing in the wintertime have serious issues caused by it. It is listed as a "Class C noxious weed" by Alabama and California, and Texas lists it as a "noxious plant", while Connecticut lists it as "potentially invasive, [but] not banned", and South Carolina lists it as an "invasive aquatic plant/plant pest". Arizona lists the water hyacinth as a "restricted noxious weed", a "regulated noxious weed", AND a "prohibited noxious weed". (Why three different classifications, I don't know.) Florida, which has possibly been plagued the most, lists the entire Eichhornia genus as a "Class 1 Prohibited aquatic plant". (They're serious about it!) As serious a problem as the common water hyacinth is, it appears that its relative, Eichhornia azurea, the "anchored water hyacinth", is a much greater threat, judging by its listing by no less than the U.S. Federal Government as a "noxious weed". Texas lists it simply as a "noxious plant", while South Carolina refers to it as an "invasive aquatic plant/plant pest". Alabama, North Carolina and Vermont all list it as a "Class A noxious weed", while it is legally "Prohibited" in Massachusetts, Arizona and, of course, Florida. Both California and Oregon officially list it under "Quarantine". Keep in mind that this entire ruckus is over a plant that has only yet been documented in one single county in Florida! By comparison, E. paniculata, the "Brazilian water hyacinth" is only legally listed by Florida (as "Prohibited"), even though it, too, has been recorded as only being found in a single county in Florida (an altogether different county). These bad boys are all beautiful, easily cared for plants, but they pack a mean environmental punch.
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