Saimese Algae Eater (Crossocheilus siamensis)
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Saimese Algae Eater (Crossocheilus siamensis)


Information

Common Name: Saimese Algae Eater
Proper Name: Crossocheilus siamensis
Category: Catfish
Temperature: 24 - 26 C
Temperament Peaceful
Maximum Size: 14 cm
 
Algae Grower
 
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I have one in my ten gallon right now until he gets big enough for the 55... very fun to watch. Always active. I have noticed a little bit of agressive behavior, but only chases fish away, never nips them. I think some of this could be due to the limited space in the ten.
 
Algae Grower
 
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fyi,if the black horizontal line doesn't extend to the fork in the tail its not an sae,but a flying fox.
 
Algae Grower
 
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I have two groups of 4 and 5 in two 75usg tanks. They are active and interesting. They do a fine job of algae control and seem to enjoy being in a group as they are usually together. They also like current and often sit at the outflows of my filters and powerheads...Nice fish:)
 
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they are always active day and night, but mostly active during when the lights are on. i feed them flake or pellets beside algae. they do very good cleaning the hair algae which is common in my tank. they hang out in group and enjoy chasing each others. i have seen them sitting on my java fern leaves, the koralia 1 flow hit the flow on java fern where they like to sit. they do try to dominate if other fish is trying to steal their food away lol. they do not hurt them but they do scare them away by hitting them with their nose. this is a great fish to watch.
 
Algae Grower
 
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I got Two SAE in a Community tank with Tetra, there no bother at all. Eat the Algea and some flake that the other fish don't get too. V nice addition to any tank.
 
Algae Grower
 
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Some of the best schooling fish in my tank. The smallest SAE's do a much better job at eating algae then the big ones.
 
pbh
Algae Grower
 
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Great algae eating fish. The true sae can be hard to find. Over the years, I have orderd them from aquariumfish.net several times. They have the true sae and I have never been disapointed. Some people have commented about how hard they are to catch when they get large. I have had good luck with the tank lights out and the room is very dark. I feed some flake food or wafers and they come out out to eat. It is easy to net them if the room and tank are dark enough. It seems they can't see the dark green net I use.
 
Newbie
 
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I had 5 SAE (it has the full stipe from nose thru the fork in the tail) and they just spawn 2 baby SAE... how exciting!!!
 
Planted Tank Obsessed
 
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Probably the most useful algae-eating fish, since they consume black beard algae (at least, some of them do) and are able to reach places that the clumsier bristlenose cannot. If you get the correct species, they also tend to continue eating algae their entire lifespan (although there are exceptions). Siamese Algae eaters get large! Even in a large tank, their constant movement and distinctive markings make them hard to miss. For this reason, they'll affect how your tank looks. Personally, I like it. But keep this in mind when purchasing them. As noted, they are constantly active. I personally feel that a tank of at least 4' in length is ideal. They come from fast-flowing waters and appreciate free swimming space and current. They should be kept in pairs. While single fish won't pine away like some schooling species, it seems kinder to keep them in at least a pair. In two years I've never seen them more than 6" apart from each other. They will not become aggressive with age. They will not harm any other fish, though may become the subject of hostility should you include the related sharks or flying foxes. You can't breed them in a home aquarium. They're often confused with different, less helpful, species, such as the "False Siamensis" (I'm told this is because they often school together in the wild when caught, but I suspect unscrupulous breeders are more to blame). It's best to have a look at some pictures so you know what to look for - once you've actually seen a real specimen in the flesh, you won't have any trouble spotting them. Should you realise your new acquisition is a False Siamensis, you'll want to remove it as quickly as possible - they can grow into real terrors. They're almost impossible to catch with a net, especially in a planted tank. Cut a coke bottle in half, upend the top and shove it into the bottom section, and put an algae wafer or fish food in as bait. You won't have to wait long. They're greedy eaters, and will eat anything they can catch (bloodworms, flake, whatever). Lightly blanched or microwaved vegetables (carrots and zucchini, but not cucumber) are better, however, along with spirulina flakes and algae discs. Ensure they don't boss your corydoras off their food. Highly recommended - cleared my 90 gallon of all algae in about two days, and I haven't seen ANY in the two years since.
 
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Not a Catfish, but a Cyprinid.
 
Algae Grower
 
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Snafuspyramid, I was going to say the same thing about the BBA, I have literally taken plants out of my friends tank that have BBA and put them in my 20g quan tank and within a few days the algae is completely gone.
 
Planted Tank Enthusiast
 
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I wouldn't sell my group of 8 for almost any amount of money. They saved my life when an entire 75 gallon tank full of java moss/plants became overrun with BBA while I was away at school and my father has turned the light timer to 24/7. Needless to say, they have paid for themselves in the amount of plants I didn't have to throw away. Excellent schooling fish! I'm lucky to have even found them in a petstore. If I ever come across them again I will buy them in a heartbeat just in case I know someone who needs them.
 
Planted Tank Guru
 
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I purchased 5 of this species on 5-30-2005 and I still have a lone survivor as of 8-10-2012, he/she is 5.5 inches long and gets along well with all his tank mates, this is a very easy species to keep but a larger tank is a plus, mine are in a 150 gallon and are the largest species in the tank and be prepared to have them a long time. They do graze on BBA and other algaes but don't purchase them for this reason alone because they are not the same hard working fish like an Otocinclus and will eventually eat flake or algae wafer with all your other livestock. I tried to post a photo of this very mature fish but I think the photo are is full, which is to bad because he really is beautiful and quite different looking than the juveniles already posted.
 
Planted Tank Enthusiast
 
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Had 1 of these in a 10g until I found out they aren't really algae eaters and actually eat the slime coat on your fish. Never getting one again...
 
Planted Tank Enthusiast
 
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Whoops this is Siamese not Chinese. Forget what I said I know nothing about this fish lol
 
Algae Grower
 
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I have two siamese algae eaters, however they hardly seem to bother with the algae that builds up in my 176L tank! I do have 2 sterbas corys who i feed sinking tablet food to, are my SAEs not eating algae because they don't need to, if so is there a better algae eating fish, i was considering a bristle nose plec, any thoughts...
 
Junior Member
 
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Love this fish for being a very active hardy algae eater. I had a pair and one day one just disappeared in my heavily planted tank. I felt bad for the one being lonely but since he's so large now I don't wish to buy another. I have noticed it schooling with my Otocinclus from time to time until it just gets bored.
 
Wannabe Guru
 
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While these fish may be good algae eaters, particularly at a young age, they will eat more fish food than anything as they get larger. Oh and another thing they love to eat is moss. Java and fissidens in my case. They literally stripped the java moss to the bones for lack of a better expression and they ate all the green buds off of the fissidens in the tank. Not that they aren't good fish and I didn't have the moss eating problem when they were younger, but beware if you want your moss to stay alive.

Images

Saimese Algae Eater
Saimese Algae Eater
Saimese Algae Eater
Saimese Algae Eater
Saimese Algae Eater
Saimese Algae Eater
Saimese Algae Eater
 

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