Opinions on discus - The Planted Tank Forum
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 16 (permalink) Old 02-20-2013, 03:57 AM Thread Starter
Planted Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: USA
Posts: 150
Opinions on discus

The owner of my lfs said that it was ok to keep a pair or trio of discus as long as you watch the fish and select the ones that are less aggressive. I just want to here opinions on this subject. Thank you
charliey is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 16 (permalink) Old 02-20-2013, 04:23 AM
Planted Tank Enthusiast
 
tomfromstlouis's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Saint Louis
Posts: 802
I have never kept discus, so hopefully more experienced folks will chime in (Yo, discuspaul!), but I do not think aggression is the main issue. Water quality is probably the big issue, but there is way more.

Visit the simplydiscus.com forums for all your discus questions. Read and learn; it is the distilled knowledge of many which is always better than one opinion. Start here: http://www.simplydiscus.com/library/index.shtml

RAOK Club #76

220g altum, 75g high tech, 6g shrimp: one office, three tanks http://www.plantedtank.net/forums/sh...d.php?t=183658
tomfromstlouis is offline  
post #3 of 16 (permalink) Old 02-20-2013, 04:56 AM Thread Starter
Planted Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: USA
Posts: 150
Thanks for the reply, but i cant seem to find a straight answer to this question for some reason
charliey is offline  
post #4 of 16 (permalink) Old 02-20-2013, 05:16 AM
Planted Tank Guru
 
discuspaul's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: British Columbia, Canada
Posts: 2,876
Quote:
Originally Posted by charliey View Post
The owner of my lfs said that it was ok to keep a pair or trio of discus as long as you watch the fish and select the ones that are less aggressive. I just want to here opinions on this subject. Thank you
That is nonsense - there is absolutely no way to determine which discus will be less, or more, aggressive than any other. And sure, you can 'watch them', lol - but what do you do when the aggession gets too serious ?
Well, you have to separate them - there's no other way, except to add more discus to spread the aggression out and minimize it.

Any experienced discus-keeper would tell you that keeping only 2, 3, or even 4 discus, is almost a certain invitation to pecking order/aggression problems, often resulting in one or two fish being badly bullied, stressed and subject to resulting health issues.
Keeping just two should only be done if it is a proven mated pair. A single discus would likely be quite lonely.
discuspaul is offline  
post #5 of 16 (permalink) Old 02-20-2013, 05:19 AM
Planted Tank Enthusiast
 
Ashnic05's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 510
Discus require more acidic pH and warmer temperatures. They are semi-aggressive but have been known to be kept with a school of tetras (Cardinals are a popular option) and usually keep aggression among themselves. You don't want an overly aggressive Discus, but you don't want a pansy either. If you are keeping more than two and you have two pair up, the third will be bullied so you need to keep a group. How aggressive they are will depend on their individual personality and their relative size to the other Discus and if there's enough room in the tank for individual territories. Some find it challenging to keep them because of their specific water parameters, but many do so successfully.

“Alive without breath,
As cold as death;
Never thirsty, ever drinking,
All in mail never clinking.”
― J.R.R. Tolkien

FINNEX CLUB MEMBER!

Last edited by Ashnic05; 02-20-2013 at 05:21 AM. Reason: .
Ashnic05 is offline  
post #6 of 16 (permalink) Old 02-20-2013, 05:20 AM
Planted Tank Obsessed
 
Dx3Bash's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Minnesota
Posts: 468
Quote:
Originally Posted by charliey View Post
Thanks for the reply, but i cant seem to find a straight answer to this question for some reason
What exactly is the "question"? If you are asking if you should watch for aggressive behavior and select those with more docile behavior, that is not something I have ever considered. I usually select the more active and dominate specimen. I feel it is healthier, stronger and dominate for a reason. If your intent is to some day breed them, why would you choose weaker specimens? 2 or 3 Discus would be okay, but you need a big tank for these fish. I wouldn't recommend anything smaller than a 75 gallon. Yes, I know plenty of people have kept them in a 55, or even smaller, but I will stick to my comment that they do significantly better in a larger (75+) size tank. Discus can be nervous when you only keep 2 or 3 fish, not to mention the aggression problems that can arise causing stress to the weaker fish. In my opinion, the more the better (6+). They also do not like very active tank mates, so choose carefully.
Dx3Bash is offline  
post #7 of 16 (permalink) Old 02-20-2013, 05:22 AM
Planted Tank Nation
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Oak Park, IL
Posts: 888
If you feel your tank is only big enough for three, then I don't think your tank is big enough in my opinion. And it is very hard to tell the behavior of fish in a store, because it is such a stressful environment
mitchfish9 is offline  
post #8 of 16 (permalink) Old 02-20-2013, 05:36 AM
Planted Member
 
manzpants92's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Oconomowoc WI
Posts: 209
Great advice up above. For an example of observing the fish and being able to tell which ones are more aggressive and more calm-not true. My lowest/shy discus on the pecking order in my 55 gallon turned out to be the most aggressive when put in another tank, there is really no telling unless you get all the fish together.

The only time you can really keep two discus is when they are a mated pair, then they won't bully each other. When i had two discus in quarantine tank together one started bullying the other so badly that i had to introduce the bully into my main tank to give the shyer one a chance.

However one thing that is great about discus is its always a journey, so if you want to try it go for it, thing is many of us have gone through it many times so hopefully you take some of the advice with a grain of salt. One thing i learned with discus is even if you think its going to work and "oh i can make that work, won't happen to me even though all the websites say not to" doesn't work. Chances are your going to get similar results

Hope some of this helps, good luck

Travis
manzpants92 is offline  
post #9 of 16 (permalink) Old 02-20-2013, 05:49 AM
Planted Tank Guru
 
discuspaul's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: British Columbia, Canada
Posts: 2,876
To add to my above comments, Charlie, if your LFS owner meant for you to spend several hours in his store watching the discus in his tank(s) so that you could take notes on which fish seemed to be more gentle, or less aggessive, than others, and then just buy those ..... then that is still meaningless - example:
If you selected 3 'seemingly unaggressive' discus out of a tank of say, a dozen discus, and took those 3 home to a new tank, you would simply be completely changing the dynamics of the group.
Of your 3 fish, one of them would very likely take on the dominant role, begin establishing his dominance through aggression, and you would have one or both the other fish being bullied. That's the way it is with discus - follow ?
discuspaul is offline  
post #10 of 16 (permalink) Old 02-20-2013, 04:58 PM Thread Starter
Planted Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: USA
Posts: 150
Thanks eveyone i think ill just wait and get a larger tank, and ill get 5 discus
charliey is offline  
post #11 of 16 (permalink) Old 02-20-2013, 06:42 PM
Planted Tank Guru
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Gone
Posts: 5,993
Quote:
Originally Posted by discuspaul View Post
That is nonsense - there is absolutely no way to determine which discus will be less, or more, aggressive than any other. And sure, you can 'watch them', lol - but what do you do when the aggession gets too serious ?
....
Don't believe another thing that LFS person tells you.

Take advice from Paul on Discus. When you need solid advise we have members here with experience on every facet of the hobby.

If the LFS has healthy stock give them the business, just don't take their advice.
DogFish is offline  
post #12 of 16 (permalink) Old 02-21-2013, 04:38 AM Thread Starter
Planted Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: USA
Posts: 150
Also if I bought Seachem discus buffer would that soften tap water enough so that discus can live in it happily?
charliey is offline  
post #13 of 16 (permalink) Old 02-21-2013, 03:16 PM
Planted Tank Enthusiast
 
tomfromstlouis's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Saint Louis
Posts: 802
As I suggested above, we have a handful of discus experts on this forum, but it is a forum primarily for planted tanks. If you have more detailed discus-specific questions it would be wise to sign on the simplydiscus and search their forum. I imagine that Seachem product has been dissected ten different ways over there. They have an entire forum just for water issues.

Getting into discus is a serious undertaking. As for anything discus FISH oriented, I would trust them first. If you have any questions about PLANTS in a discus tank, this is the place.

RAOK Club #76

220g altum, 75g high tech, 6g shrimp: one office, three tanks http://www.plantedtank.net/forums/sh...d.php?t=183658
tomfromstlouis is offline  
post #14 of 16 (permalink) Old 03-03-2013, 01:53 AM Thread Starter
Planted Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: USA
Posts: 150
It seems that everyone at simply discus is wayy over exaggerating the water quality that discus need. When I've seen them doing fine at a normal 30% percent a week wc. They were tamling about a 50% daily minimum, wich seems to be a waste of water.
charliey is offline  
post #15 of 16 (permalink) Old 03-03-2013, 03:08 AM
Planted Tank Guru
 
discuspaul's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: British Columbia, Canada
Posts: 2,876
Hey, Charliey,
You might care to have a read of this - see point # 3 in particular.
These 'rules' were written by myself, after quite of few years' experience keeping discus, and it's what you need to do, to be successful keeping discus.




D-I-S-C-U-S - 6 CARDINAL RULES FOR NEWBIES TO FOLLOW

by discuspaul » Sun Feb 17, 2013 11:55 am

First I'd just like to mention once again that discus are hardier than many people think, and are not difficult to keep, so long as one is prepared to accept and adhere to a few key practices that will provide the best chances of success with discus.

There is nothing new here to experienced discus-keepers in the listing of the points that follow, and even to many newcomers to discus who have at one time or another, read these simple but effective recommendations, and recognize their validity.

The problem I found however, judging by the large number of posts by discus newbies on several forums that reflect frustration, disappointment and misfortunes, is that it seems far too many novices to discus, for whatever reasons, do not pay serious attention to what they're being advised to do, or not do.

Perhaps this is because they think they may know better than the discus 'gurus'. Either that, or they don't have the time, inclination, or financial resources to do what is being suggested, and follow a different path.

Some may feel they just want to try a different approach, deviate
somewhat, try something new they feel will work for them - whatever - there are many reasons why some newbies will proceed in another direction, only to be met with failure.

Which leads me to post what might be considered to be trite, old hat, redundant, or even agonizingly repetitive commentary, but following this undernoted advice should prove to be a near guarantee that one will achieve success with discus.

This listing is recorded more or less in order of importance:

1) - D - Do your homework well before delving into discus. Read and research all you can beforehand. Googling will certainly help, as well as spending a good deal of time reading the posts and threads on the simplydiscus.com forum, particularly the stickies in their 'Discus Basics'
section, which will provide you with much of the material you need to digest.

2) - I - Investigate and learn of the best sources to get your discus stock. Find those breeders &/or importers that are long time, well-experienced, responsible, reputable, and known to supply high quality, healthy, and well-shaped discus. Buy your discus from one of these sources in order to insure that you get off on the best footing possible.
This is the single, most important factor in succeeding with discus.

3) - S - Set up and plan to follow a strict regular routine of fresh water changes, tank wipe-downs and cleansing, vacuuming of wastes, and regular filter and media cleaning, changes, replacements, and maintenance. Be fully prepared for the kind of commitment it takes to produce and maintain the highest water quality and conditions that you can.

4) - C - Carefully consider the type of tank set up you start with. Make sure the tank size is ample enough to start with 5 or 6 discus. Don't be tempted to begin with a tank of less than 55 or 60 gallons, and don't try to justify going smaller by just getting 1, 2, 3, or 4 discus for cost or other reasons.
Wait till you have sufficient resources to get a proper-sized tank, and the suitable size and number of fish to insure continuing good health and harmonious discus sociability.
Do not start with small, undersized, very juvenile fish which have not yet developed a more mature immune system, are more demanding to raise properly, and much more prone to health problems and other issues. Get fish of at least 3.0" in size, preferably larger.

5) - U - Undertake to start off with a bare bottom tank, unless you're getting fully adult fish and have previous good experience with maintaining a planted tank. If you must have some decor, limit yourself to a very thin sand substrate layer, and perhaps a piece of driftwood with just a couple of small plants attached, or one or two potted plants.
Once you gain several months' of experience getting to know your discus' traits & behavior, and your discus get larger, then you may proceed to an aquascaped environment. Feed a varied diet, several times a day, and learn which foods will achieve a nutritious diet, by researching.

6) - S - Simplify. Keep things as simple as you can to start. Don't complicate your start with discus, at least at first, by placing them in a heavily planted environment, using CO2 and a strict fertilization regime. Make sure your tank is fully cycled before adding the fish, and don't be tempted to alter or change the pH of your water, or modify your water conditions and params by using chemicals of any kind. No need to use RO water or adopt any other procedures that would tend to complicate what should be a simple start to your discus launch.

Follow these 'rules', and there's little doubt you will succeed with discus !
discuspaul is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the The Planted Tank Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in









Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome