Floating Plant Recommendations... - The Planted Tank Forum
 5Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 21 (permalink) Old 02-08-2017, 01:31 PM Thread Starter
Planted Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Location: St. Louis, Missouri
Posts: 195
Floating Plant Recommendations...

I've become interested in floating plants that are good at consuming Ammonia and Nitrates...I have a 29 gallon fresh water 18" tall cube tank with an HOB Aquaclear filter. I have 3 German Blue Rams, 5 Glow Fish, and 4 Corydoras.

I've considered several varieties such as frogbit, dwarf water lettuce, hornwort, just to name a few. I've ruled out Duckweed, just because of the maintenance issues.

My tank has a glass cover, and the cover sits about a 1/2" below my Current LED light, which is flat, and the LED light fixture also sits in close proximity to the surface of the water, where the floating plants might be floating around. The light fixture is positioned probably about 1.5" - 2" from the water's surface.

I have a few Anubias plants in the tank, which I've super glued to some resin decorations. So, I'm concerned that whatever floating plant I select, I'll need to keep it closely maintained so that it doesn't completely block out all the light, even though Anubias doesn't require much light.

I'm looking for a floating variety that soaks up Nitrates and Ammonia well, clears the glass top when it's in the down position, doesn't require an excessive amount of maintenance, something that doesn't migrate down and become too entangled with the decorations or try to root in the substrate, and something that can absorb light positioned close to the floating plant without being adversely effected.

Any suggestions and why?

Last edited by Quizcat; 02-08-2017 at 01:43 PM. Reason: Tank Description...
Quizcat is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 21 (permalink) Old 02-08-2017, 02:18 PM
Planted Tank Guru
 
roadmaster's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Missouri united states
Posts: 4,966
I've got duckweed, and takes all of about five minutes to net out a large portion of it when I do weekly water changes.
All started with a tiny bit of the duck weed that came with some shrimp I ordered.
roadmaster is offline  
post #3 of 21 (permalink) Old 02-08-2017, 02:24 PM
Planted Tank Enthusiast
 
Econde's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: Champaign, IL
Posts: 554
Quote:
Originally Posted by roadmaster View Post
I've got duckweed, and takes all of about five minutes to net out a large portion of it when I do weekly water changes.
All started with a tiny bit of the duck weed that came with some shrimp I ordered.
I hear ya. I ordered some Red root floaters, there was probably 5-8 pieces of duckweed on there. I was able to take most of them out from my community tank, but I left them alone in my betta tank and vase. It's not too bad really.
Econde is offline  
 
post #4 of 21 (permalink) Old 02-08-2017, 02:30 PM
Planted Tank Guru
 
roadmaster's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Missouri united states
Posts: 4,966
Quote:
Originally Posted by Econde View Post
I hear ya. I ordered some Red root floaters, there was probably 5-8 pieces of duckweed on there. I was able to take most of them out from my community tank, but I left them alone in my betta tank and vase. It's not too bad really.
Yes,I use fairly big net and just do figure eight's with it over the surface once a week.
I got it everywhere.
Econde likes this.
roadmaster is offline  
post #5 of 21 (permalink) Old 02-08-2017, 02:59 PM
Planted Tank Enthusiast
 
Econde's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: Champaign, IL
Posts: 554
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quizcat View Post
I've become interested in floating plants that are good at consuming Ammonia and Nitrates...I have a 29 gallon fresh water 18" tall cube tank with an HOB Aquaclear filter. I have 3 German Blue Rams, 5 Glow Fish, and 4 Corydoras.

I've considered several varieties such as frogbit, dwarf water lettuce, hornwort, just to name a few. I've ruled out Duckweed, just because of the maintenance issues.

My tank has a glass cover, and the cover sits about a 1/2" below my Current LED light, which is flat, and the LED light fixture also sits in close proximity to the surface of the water, where the floating plants might be floating around. The light fixture is positioned probably about 1.5" - 2" from the water's surface.

I have a few Anubias plants in the tank, which I've super glued to some resin decorations. So, I'm concerned that whatever floating plant I select, I'll need to keep it closely maintained so that it doesn't completely block out all the light, even though Anubias doesn't require much light.

I'm looking for a floating variety that soaks up Nitrates and Ammonia well, clears the glass top when it's in the down position, doesn't require an excessive amount of maintenance, something that doesn't migrate down and become too entangled with the decorations or try to root in the substrate, and something that can absorb light positioned close to the floating plant without being adversely effected.

Any suggestions and why?
I think any type of floaters would help you out on what you need. I'm biased towards red root floaters. Any you choose will help suck up excess nutrients from the water column. Good luck!

Sent from my A0001 using Tapatalk
Econde is offline  
post #6 of 21 (permalink) Old 02-08-2017, 03:50 PM
Planted Tank Enthusiast
 
Join Date: May 2016
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 863
To keep the roots shorter, silvia minima is a great choice. It also has thinner leaves that don't block out quite as much light. It does grow a bit quicker than others, but I'd imagine that is driven by amount of nutrients it is soaking up.

I also like dwarf water lettuce which doesn't get too terribly long of roots. They grow a lot slower as well, and you could always just break off any longer roots you don't like.

I have a lot of silvia minima, Amazon frogbit, and some dwarf water lettuce, and I often ship packages of all three for $5 - just enough to cover shipping and packaging materials costs. Let me know if any or all of those interest you, and I can get you taken care of
Econde and justinmo like this.
natemcnutty is online now  
post #7 of 21 (permalink) Old 02-08-2017, 04:38 PM
Wannabe Guru
 
GrampsGrunge's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Diatom Alley, Lakeside, OR
Posts: 1,075
I can't for the life of me, grow duckweed in our water here. It hangs around and slowly turns yellow and fades away.

But I can grow Pinnate Water Sprite floating, and I sure wish that Oakleaf Water Sprite( Ceratopteris Cornuta ) was more available, as it's a much better as a floating water fern. Locally there's a native Hornwort here that does well in our water, but it's home to some nasty little Annelid diatom worms that have spines that hurt my fish.

I also can grow one of my varieties of Java Fern as a floating plant, but they tend to 'ball up' with the leaves all curled around themselves.

Starting small, keeping it simple..(?)
85 gallon stock tank, "pond"
5g low-tech Java Fern jungle.
2.5g +1.2g satellite stream-clay crypt and Fern tank.
20 GallonH Streamsoil dirt tank
Pendant-hooded, LED A19 bulb lighting.
GrampsGrunge is online now  
post #8 of 21 (permalink) Old 02-08-2017, 04:42 PM
Wannabe Guru
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: rochester ny
Posts: 1,313
I'm not sure how well frogbitand or water price would fair with a lid, they like to stay dry on the leaves and that much humidity might be an issue. Don't believe the people saying duckweed is fine, it will drive you nuts. It gets everywhere and on everything and during water changes it gets stick in decorations and plants and makes your tank look like a snow globe.i would recommend Silvana or red root floater since they're the best fit with what you're looking for

As to light penetrating, you should be fine with Anubias even if the surface gets packed with floaters. The light filtering through is enough to get decent growth
theatermusic87 is online now  
post #9 of 21 (permalink) Old 02-08-2017, 05:05 PM
Algae Grower
 
ustabefast's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2017
Location: Santa Barbara
Posts: 52
I use Pearlweed as a floater. It's very versatile as I trim it and use as groundcover in my Medium light tank and then just float the trimmings in my 10 gallon and 20 gallon tanks.
The individual plants will clump together and form a nice mass and should not block out too much light for your Anubias.
ustabefast is offline  
post #10 of 21 (permalink) Old 02-08-2017, 05:13 PM
Planted Tank Enthusiast
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: NJ
Posts: 577
Frogbit . Works fine for me using lids . Can't stand duckweed , spreads like wildfire , tough to get rid of , especially if you've got multiple tanks .
someoldguy is online now  
post #11 of 21 (permalink) Old 02-08-2017, 05:15 PM
Algae Grower
 
Fishbeard's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Posts: 143
I've been looking into floating plants for my 20g high as well, and through some research I stumbled on using Brazilian Pennywort as a floating plant... does anyone have experience with that?
Tanks! likes this.
Fishbeard is online now  
post #12 of 21 (permalink) Old 02-08-2017, 05:16 PM
Wannabe Guru
 
sohankpatel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Location: Naperville, Illinois
Posts: 1,530
Red root floaters, big leaves, grows at a manageable rate, and the roots are fairly short. They also do a good job keeping nitrates down.

A 16-year old that faces parental opposition in this hobby
http://www.plantedtank.net/forums/image.php?type=sigpic&userid=237065&dateline=14898  54398
55g High Tech, Dutch (Sort of)
sohankpatel is online now  
post #13 of 21 (permalink) Old 02-08-2017, 10:01 PM
Planted Member
 
Aquamom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: north Idaho panhandle
Posts: 211
Anacharis and/or Elodea are good floaters, along with hornwort, which is what I have in my tanks. Duckweed became a real pest in my 20, blocking out the light. I finally got rid of all of it, and won't be introducing it again. Conversely, it's fine in my outdoor pond. Red root floaters I've never been able to find, but would like to try those. Do they thrive in a cooler water tank? How much light will they tolerate?

I love my Dojos; my Dojos love me,
As long as I feed them, happy they'll be!
Aquamom is offline  
post #14 of 21 (permalink) Old 02-08-2017, 11:45 PM
Algae Grower
 
Join Date: Jul 2016
Location: Wilton, Maine
Posts: 13
Red root floaters are a favorite of mine.I grow them outside up here in Maine during the summer. In full sun, they are all red but fade when I take them indoors in the fall.More light inside equals more red and vise versa.I could send you some in warmer whether.
Big Blue Frog is offline  
post #15 of 21 (permalink) Old 02-09-2017, 01:34 PM Thread Starter
Planted Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Location: St. Louis, Missouri
Posts: 195
Nitrate Absorption Rates?

Since the floaters multiply rapidly, which could also be a detractor with respect to most floating varieties, they're going to process more in Nitrates on the whole, based solely on their ability to multiply and rapidly out pace other types of plants in the tank.

If the fast proliferation of floaters multiplying versus a slow growing plant like Anubias, then it's logical to conclude that you're going to end up with a higher rate of Nitrates being processed by the whole when comparing Anubias, which grows more slowly, and is customarily planted in a lesser volume than what floaters can achieve in a very short time at their peak.

Anybody know the actual rates at which Anubias can process Nitrates by weight over time, versus the volume of Nitrates floaters are capable of processing by weight over time?

I'm just curious if you can start out planting something like Anubias in an equal weight by volume to what would eventually accrue in a very short time from floaters, which would eventually be covering the top of the tank. Would you end up with an equally impressive Nitrate processing capability from Anubias, if you just planted more of it, equal to what would accrue from the floaters at their peak by weight.

On the other hand, if the floaters process at a faster rate by equal volume, then floaters are the obvious preference to planting more of other kinds of less invasive, slower growing, and lower maintenance plants.

Last edited by Quizcat; 02-09-2017 at 05:32 PM. Reason: phrasing...
Quizcat is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the The Planted Tank Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in









Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome