Easiest nano fish - The Planted Tank Forum
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post #1 of 38 (permalink) Old 02-11-2017, 08:29 AM Thread Starter
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Easiest nano fish

I am about to put up a moderately planted 12 gallon tank with large canister filter. Quite a lot of rock formations & driftwood. There will be Malaysian trumpet snails, but I have not yet made a final decision between these fishes:

- Celestial Pearl Danio
- Pygmy Corydora
- Ember Tetra


QUESTIONS
- is one of them hardier or easier to keep in general than the others? I can only find a lot of information per one species, but they are never compared head to head.
- when only the well being of the fish is concerned, what would be optimum number of the fish of species I listed? More the merrier since they like big groups, but the tank is not that big. My own guess is 10-12?


I've read a lot of them and they all have their good and bad aspects in terms of looks and behavior. I'm looking for a group of small fish since i don't want my 4 year old son to get attached too much on individual fish. I'm a beginner but I've done my homework well and it will be a species only tank so I'm able to focus on well being of one species only. The water parameters from tap are pH 7.3 / gH 3.5 / kH 3 / TDS 100. I have a heater, but I would ideally like to keep the tank quite cool (22-24 C)
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post #2 of 38 (permalink) Old 02-11-2017, 08:48 AM
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Corydoras pygmaeus and habrosus.

Small stiphodon gobies in an established planted tank with noobie species plants is a very easy task.

Bump: The habrosus cory will be out more acting like a cory too.
We have 3.
'Still searching for more.
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post #3 of 38 (permalink) Old 02-11-2017, 09:22 AM
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12 Gallon is too small to allow a decent school of tetras.
I also like the idea of pygmy cories.

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post #4 of 38 (permalink) Old 02-11-2017, 10:55 AM
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Quote:
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12 Gallon is too small to allow a decent school of tetras.
I also like the idea of pygmy cories.
I agree.

kind of!
Well, kind of...

-how do i Know this? hehe
That's 35+ plus inches long.


I would not say they are happy, but a 12gallon long will home tetras well until they grow up, depending on a school size.

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post #5 of 38 (permalink) Old 02-11-2017, 12:53 PM
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Why not try nano gourami's. I have sparkling and Chocolate . Neither get over an 1-1 1/2 "
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post #6 of 38 (permalink) Old 02-11-2017, 01:13 PM Thread Starter
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Why not try nano gourami's. I have sparkling and Chocolate . Neither get over an 1-1 1/2 "
According to my research notes: "Need to be taught to eat dry food / Picky eater, Water quite warm 25C+, Not hardy". Otherwise they seem really nice.
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post #7 of 38 (permalink) Old 02-11-2017, 04:01 PM
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I'd second sparkling gouramis, they have lots of personality and mine at least ate dry food straight off, I think chocolate gourami is trickier but I don't keep them
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post #8 of 38 (permalink) Old 02-11-2017, 04:46 PM
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Chocolate gouramies need soft, acid, preferably tannin stained, WARM water (I talked to someone who has spawned them at 94 degrees! They need 80 or higher) and often live or frozen foods (chocolate gouramies are more willing to take prepared foods if kept with non-picky schooling fish); further, chocolates get closer to 2-2.5 inches (not huge by any standard, but seemingly a touch bigger than what you're shooting for). Much easier are Heterandria formosa...not at all colorful, but they are EXTREMELY hardy, not even slightly shy, and breed easily. The desert goby is another very hardy, easy to breed, bold fish that you can keep a pair or small group in a tank of this size without a heater...just make sure they have a good lid (they JUMP!). Currently I have Nothobranchius guentheri killifishes in a standard 10 gallon (the dominant male is just short of 2 inches), and they have given me no troubles (just hatched some of their eggs Thursday night...these things are among the easiest fish to breed in existence as long as you remember they are annuals whose eggs need to incubate in damp peat for a couple months. I regularly see them futilely spawning in the tank's gravel).

EDIT: Before you suggest it, don't go for licorice gouramies, Parosphromenus...while they are far from fragile in my own personal experiences (right now these 'tropical' fish are at 64 degrees and aren't the slightest bit perturbed, they've never given me disease troubles and even the fry aren't flinched by water changes) and are superb for 5 gallon and larger tanks, they need very soft, acidic, tannin stained water (PH of 3 isn't too low for these fish! Mine are in the mid/high 4's, 0 KH and GH and TDS of 20-25ppm), live foods, and since all are endangered in the wild they really should be kept alone for breeding (which they do erratically).
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post #9 of 38 (permalink) Old 02-11-2017, 05:58 PM
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Why not try a school of white clouds, or danios? If you put a small power head on one side you could have a pretty good school of white clouds they love swimming in current and they are cold-water fish, you can keep them with some nerite snails and ghost shrimp and they would be fine. And before anyone criticizes the inverts in cold water, nerites are tidal snails that experience cold water often a night in their native habitat and with the ghost shrimp I've been keeping them in cold water for a while with no adverse effects, they even still have a nice healthy appetite

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post #10 of 38 (permalink) Old 02-11-2017, 06:50 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks for all the tips.

Least killifish has many of the specs I am looking for, but I somehow find it too boring. The desert goby is not boring at all, but I would just pity the poor fellows that move so weirdly .

I actually considered also white clouds, but at least sources I've seen, say that minimum tank size is closer to 15-20 gallons? My tank is only 18,5" wide. I've heard about Vietnamese white cloud that is smaller, but space requirements is said to be the same as for regular white clouds? They seem to be avid swimmers, so I think they would have more issues with small tank than pygmy corys for example. I do have a oversized filter that at max settings would cycle maybe 15x the tank volume per hour, so that could take care of the current for sure.

CPDs are at my list. They look nicer than pygmy corys IMO, but I like how corys behave more. But is one or the other easier to keep? Some seem to say that they have problems with pygmy corys and some have none. I have not figured out what makes the difference. Could it be that they are stressed in many aquariums due to bigger fish? And would a species only tank make a big difference?
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post #11 of 38 (permalink) Old 02-11-2017, 07:01 PM
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Again with the space issue that's why I suggested a powerhead like the ones to make a current in the tank, they can use a smaller tank as long is it's long like yours you just need a constant current to keep them really happy. To be honest I have 6 zebra danios and 6 white clouds in my 20 gallon long and the danios give the white clouds enough active play all around the tank that they kind of just follow them and end up swimming enough or so I think, they don't even really get from on side to another because the danios will change direction back to the other side and the white clouds just follow. I do have 2 pretty big ones the size of my danios so that might also help because the bigger ones want to stick with my big danios and the small white clouds want to stick with the big ones, works out really nice in my tank

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Also I have no objection against CPD as they are amazing beautiful creatures, I'm just speaking from personal experience which with CPD I have none of(hope to get some in the future)

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Last edited by Darkblade48; 02-12-2017 at 07:29 AM. Reason: Please use the edit function for back to back posts to keep threads cleaner
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post #12 of 38 (permalink) Old 02-11-2017, 07:03 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nikohak View Post
Thanks for all the tips.

Least killifish has many of the specs I am looking for, but I somehow find it too boring. The desert goby is not boring at all, but I would just pity the poor fellows that move so weirdly .

I actually considered also white clouds, but at least sources I've seen, say that minimum tank size is closer to 15-20 gallons? My tank is only 18,5" wide. I've heard about Vietnamese white cloud that is smaller, but space requirements is said to be the same as for regular white clouds? They seem to be avid swimmers, so I think they would have more issues with small tank than pygmy corys for example. I do have a oversized filter that at max settings would cycle maybe 15x the tank volume per hour, so that could take care of the current for sure.

CPDs are at my list. They look nicer than pygmy corys IMO, but I like how corys behave more. But is one or the other easier to keep? Some seem to say that they have problems with pygmy corys and some have none. I have not figured out what makes the difference. Could it be that they are stressed in many aquariums due to bigger fish? And would a species only tank make a big difference?
I have this same tank.
Have 5x rummy tetras, 3x lamplight tetra, 2x ember, 4x neon tetras, 1x guppy, 3x oto.

All fine, all shoal together.

Lost and Tomorrow - 12G Long Tank Journal
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post #13 of 38 (permalink) Old 02-11-2017, 09:14 PM
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I have to agree about the Chocolate gourami. If you're looking for an easy fish, stay away from them. I had some in a heavily planted tank for almost a year and thought I was in the clear. All four went within days of each other. I still miss them.



Stick with pygmy cories. You can also consider micro rasboras such as Boraras brigittae or Emerald Dwarf Rasboras. Scarlett Badis is also a nice small fish.
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post #14 of 38 (permalink) Old 02-12-2017, 12:41 PM
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You can go with any of the three speciesbut It sounds like you have a fairly tall tank, is it an Eclipse 12 gallon?
If that is the case I might cross off the CPD's since they tend to hang out in the lower part of the tank and the upper half would be basically empty.
I second the idea of considering micro-rasboras or micro-danios. In small tanks I prefer lots of smaller schooling fish rather than a small group of larger fish.

Bump: [QUOTE=RWaters;9918314]I have to agree about the Chocolate gourami. If you're looking for an easy fish, stay away from them. I had some in a heavily planted tank for almost a year and thought I was in the clear. All four went within days of each other. I still miss them.



I loved my Chocolate Gouramis. For about 3 weeks. Mine also died in rapid succession. I used RO water but the neutral ph was apparently still too high for them.
Really hard to keep these beauties alive.
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post #15 of 38 (permalink) Old 02-12-2017, 12:52 PM
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I have had a 10 G set up with Sparkling and Chocolate gourami's for 6 months now, only adding the driftwood for tannins and lower ph, i do use an acid buffer every few water changes to keep ph low from my tap. They are awesome fish, you are right they are micro feeders, so i powder up flakes to feed, mine are very happy with very very little attention. I'ts by far my fav community. I have 3 chocolate, 3 sparkling grouami, chili raspbora,and green neons, two hasp cory cats. I hope you reconsider nano grouami.
good luck

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