Building a 72L Aquarium stand - Completed - New pics (9/22) - Page 2 - The Planted Tank Forum
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post #16 of 62 (permalink) Old 07-24-2010, 09:28 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Hoppy View Post
I suggest birch plywood too. Oak plywood has a very porous grain, which could be a problem when you laminate, while birch is always very smooth and usually very flat. Any plywood is pretty immune to shrinkage/swelling, because of the crossed grain plies. Birch is just about the standard material for professional cabinets too. If you are just skinning over the structural frame with plywood, you don't need 3/4 inch thickness. I think 1/4 inch is too thin, so a good compromise might be 1/2 inch, saving some on weight and cost.
Agreed, I don't need 3/4". How about on the top. I know that tank water pressure is distributed around the edges. However doesn't the water column weight distribute on the bottom glass (specially for a rimless tank). If so would a 3/4" plywood be advisable for the top atleast?
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post #17 of 62 (permalink) Old 07-24-2010, 10:02 PM
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I think all rimless tanks, assuming they don't have even a bottom rim, have the bottom glass resting flat on whatever stand you use. Two points of view: one would be that you need a very flat top, supported with closely spaced structural members, and with a cushion on it to even out the load. Another is that if you were to put a bottom rim on the tank, it would only support the outer edge of the tank, so why not just support that outer edge without the rim? I think I go with the latter point, so I would want a level, even top under that outer edge only, but cut out in the middle. What would Amano do?

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post #18 of 62 (permalink) Old 07-24-2010, 10:38 PM Thread Starter
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Makes perfect sense Hoppy. I however might still consider a flat top with 1/2" plywood to place a foam mat, just to provide a even non-slip surface.

I looked at the piece of laminate I have and It is dark gray (darker than the ADA stands). The stand will be in my living room which opens up in the dining area. Both spaces have heavy dark chocolate colored wood furniture. The dining set has frosted glass center and the coffee table has a glass top. Keeping in sync, I am inclined towards hydrophytes industrial style design but add frosted glass doors and side panels.

This is how the 2 rooms look now. What do you guys think?

This is the 2 spaces together. Tank will be placed on the left wall. Hope you are not appalled by the color scheme. We wanted to keep it nice and bright specially for mellow winter


This is a view of the wall where it will be placed (on the right). Just across the stairs you can see the main door outside which (little to the right) is the garden hose outlet to be used for WC


And this is a closeup of the dining table with frosted glass center. This finish for the stand as well?
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post #19 of 62 (permalink) Old 07-25-2010, 01:13 AM
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The glass doors would be great. Your house is nice and bright so the planted tank will pop especially with the black cabinet and frosted glass doors.
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post #20 of 62 (permalink) Old 07-25-2010, 03:07 AM
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You have a very beautiful and modern looking house. A stand that matches the table would be very cool. For the stand that I have my rimless 48 gallon tank on I put a flat piece of 1/2 inch ply screwed to the frame, followed by a flat piece of 3/4 inch ply just laid on top, followed by a 3/4 inch of blue board foam insulation, followed by two layers of cardboard followed by a garden mat.
It's not only that I was nervous about my stand, but I originally designed it for a rimmed 40 breeder with the edges of the stand built up to cover the bottom plastic rim. When I decided to go rimless I no longer wanted the tank to sit in the stand, but rather on it.

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post #21 of 62 (permalink) Old 07-25-2010, 03:04 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
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The glass doors would be great. Your house is nice and bright so the planted tank will pop especially with the black cabinet and frosted glass doors.
Thank you spunjin.

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You have a very beautiful and modern looking house. A stand that matches the table would be very cool. For the stand that I have my rimless 48 gallon tank on I put a flat piece of 1/2 inch ply screwed to the frame, followed by a flat piece of 3/4 inch ply just laid on top, followed by a 3/4 inch of blue board foam insulation, followed by two layers of cardboard followed by a garden mat.
It's not only that I was nervous about my stand, but I originally designed it for a rimmed 40 breeder with the edges of the stand built up to cover the bottom plastic rim. When I decided to go rimless I no longer wanted the tank to sit in the stand, but rather on it.
Thank you CL. I have not been very regular for the last 6 months or so, so I am not quite up-to-date on the changes that have happened to known tanks. I quickly browsed your thread for 48 to get a look at the setup but looks like it has been carefully concealed.

Anyways, the explanation the Hoppy provided earlier makes perfect sense. However for a larger tank, I think it is better to have a flat surface and some non-slip should one of its corners slip out of the edges.
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post #22 of 62 (permalink) Old 07-25-2010, 03:09 PM Thread Starter
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The more I think, the more I am liking the idea of industrial finish with dark stain and frost glass doors. Guess I have my idea.

Last evening I went to Menards to check out some lumber and stains. Menards has more variety of lumber than HD or Lowes. I found some beautiful dug fir and a helpful guy who happens to have a 300G and made his own stand. He suggested dug fir and offered me to show his stand so that I get some idea.

Menards however did not have a good selection of stains though. Probably 30% of the catalog was only available and none of the darker stains.

Anyways, time to move into design stage of the frame!
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post #23 of 62 (permalink) Old 07-26-2010, 08:34 PM Thread Starter
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Design

Over the weekend I did a little bit of design on Sketchup to get an idea of the dimensions and L&F. This is how it came out.

Top and bottom frame dimensions.



Overall frame. Decided to go 30" high
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post #24 of 62 (permalink) Old 07-26-2010, 08:41 PM Thread Starter
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Over the weekend I checked the local stores for lumber and joint connectors. I really liked the dug fir available in Menards but a bit pricy (around $20 for a 10' 4X4). I'll need 5 of those to make

4 of 6'
8 of 22" for the vertical posts
8 of 10" for the horizontal spacers.

I also found these corner braces that I really liked. Did not see these in Lowes or HD. These are all anodized alu material, pretty sturdy, so I plan to use T-connectors for the interior joints.



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post #25 of 62 (permalink) Old 07-26-2010, 08:42 PM
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4x4's are total overbuild.. I'd suggest you go with a similar layout constructed of 2x4's instead.
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post #26 of 62 (permalink) Old 07-26-2010, 08:58 PM Thread Starter
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I know. 2X4 is structurally sufficient for a tank of this size. I'm however planning on 4X4 for the uniform look like hydrophyte's industrial style stand. he has 2X4 cross beams though, which I can do as well, but I'll need to buy more pieces of lumber to have different cuts from different thicknesses.
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post #27 of 62 (permalink) Old 07-26-2010, 08:59 PM Thread Starter
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This gives an idea of how it will look with the stain and frosted glass panels and doors


with the connectors attached.


and with the tank hoisted on top


how does it look? too much metal?
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post #28 of 62 (permalink) Old 07-26-2010, 09:04 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by malaybiswas View Post
I know. 2X4 is structurally sufficient for a tank of this size. I'm however planning on 4X4 for the uniform look like hydrophyte's industrial style stand. he has 2X4 cross beams though, which I can do as well, but I'll need to buy more pieces of lumber to have different cuts from different thicknesses.
Ah, I got ya... Have you considered using dowels to hold your 4x4's together? 4 3/4" pins in a square pattern would look nice..
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post #29 of 62 (permalink) Old 07-26-2010, 09:59 PM Thread Starter
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I have, but I am not sure if I can line dowel pilot holes correctly.

For now material list stands to

1. 4X4 dug fir for frame
2. 1/2 birchwood ply for top
3. galvanized alu angle, tee and corner brackets
4. #8 anodized nails (internal joints)
5. Wood screws for exterior joints - visual appeal
6. glass
7. stain & sealant
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post #30 of 62 (permalink) Old 07-26-2010, 11:25 PM
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Make a jig. I have always thought of dowels / biscuits / etc as a way to secure wood until the glue drys. I am sure it provides some support, but not nearly as much as wood glue.

Make a jig out of a piece of bent metal. Drill where you want your pilots for your dowels, and use that to guide your drilling. Or buy a biscuit cutter (not the kind you bake with :P). I use it a lot, and it helps you jig it up nice and straight.
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