saying goodbye to the "hail mary" of gas exchange - Page 2 - The Planted Tank Forum
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post #16 of 21 (permalink) Old 04-04-2013, 01:57 PM
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Re: saying goodbye to the "hail mary" of gas exchange

Mine is angled upward, creating ridges on the water surface¹. This and attempting to maintain 10-20 ppm nitrate have allowed me to keep a thriving colony of inverts in a high tech tank for the first time, including successfully breeding shrimp.

The filter is on full blast and I'm also using a nano power head, so flow is noticeable.

The downside is that now I can't keep slow moving showpiece fish like dwarf gouramis. They have a great deal of character so it's a real loss.

¹ Despite this, I still occasionally have a light protein film.

29g high tech, 10g low tech halfmoon, and please see my 5g crescent journal.
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post #17 of 21 (permalink) Old 04-04-2013, 11:58 PM
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Originally Posted by WheeledGoat View Post
I guess I could google it, but since I'm already here.... why is duckweed security?
I once read that duckweed can help with the transfer of oxygen to the water column. Most people don't want it because it grows really fast and can be hard to impossible to get rid of. If it is not controlled, it can entirely cover the surface and created a barrier to the atmosphere, though.

I could be wrong about its usefulness as a surface plant. Maybe I should google it.

I hope things are going well with your CO2.
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post #18 of 21 (permalink) Old 04-06-2013, 12:48 PM
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Originally Posted by Skunky View Post
I once read that duckweed can help with the transfer of oxygen to the water column. Most people don't want it because it grows really fast and can be hard to impossible to get rid of. If it is not controlled, it can entirely cover the surface and created a barrier to the atmosphere, though.

I could be wrong about its usefulness as a surface plant. Maybe I should google it.

I hope things are going well with your CO2.

all aquatic plants to my knowledge send oxygen to their root zones. this is beneficial to the bacteria growing there and to oxidze heavy metals to protect themselves.
so in essence yes a floating plant will help. probably more than a submerged plant simply because a floatin plant recieves more carbon and light energy at the surface and can theirfore photosynthesize more, = hopefully more oxygen
their generally growth rates sure do support that hypothesis
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post #19 of 21 (permalink) Old 04-06-2013, 01:06 PM
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Re: saying goodbye to the "hail mary" of gas exchange

That might be beneficial with DWL and frogbit, but the microns-long roots of duckweed?

29g high tech, 10g low tech halfmoon, and please see my 5g crescent journal.
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post #20 of 21 (permalink) Old 04-06-2013, 03:10 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Rainer View Post
Mine is angled upward, creating ridges on the water surface¹. This and attempting to maintain 10-20 ppm nitrate have allowed me to keep a thriving colony of inverts in a high tech tank for the first time, including successfully breeding shrimp.

The filter is on full blast and I'm also using a nano power head, so flow is noticeable.

The downside is that now I can't keep slow moving showpiece fish like dwarf gouramis. They have a great deal of character so it's a real loss.

¹ Despite this, I still occasionally have a light protein film.
You're my new hero. I'm a big fan of footnotes. Never seen one in a forum post before. That made my day!
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post #21 of 21 (permalink) Old 04-06-2013, 07:48 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Skunky View Post
Most people don't want it because it grows really fast and can be hard to impossible to get rid of.

please forgive me for being so dense, but if it's a floating plant, why would it be any harder than scooping it out?
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